The Gerontological Society of America

 
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Home About Us History

History

The nation's oldest and largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to research, education, and practice in the field of aging has crossed a milestone.  For the past 65 years, GSA has been committed to providing resources and opportunities for its members.  Now, faced with a growing baby boomer population, the demand for aging-related professionals has accelerated.  GSA is proud to continue supporting its members in this vastly changing environment.  After more than 65 years of excellence, GSA is stronger than ever.

Commemorative Book coverGSA's 65th anniversary commemorative book, "Leading the Way for 65 Years," is now available for free download. It lists the Society's greatest accomplishments and gives a listing of major figures who helped shape its history, including officers, directors, and Annual Scientific Meeting locations and themes.

1939: The Society is conceived after a group of 24 scientists and physicians (some of them participants at a 1937 Woods Hole conference) formed the Club for Research on Ageing.

1945: The Society is formally established in New York, NY, to "promote the scientific study of aging." The office is located in St. Louis, MO. (Read more about GSA's ongoing mission on page 7 of the December 2010 issue of Gerontology News!)

1946: The first issue of The Journal of Gerontology is published.

1949: The first Annual Scientific Meeting is held in New York, NY. (Read more on page 7 of the September 2010 issue of Gerontology News!)

1952: GSA membership is divided into four sections: two basic science sections (Biological Sciences and Psychological & Social Sciences) and two applied sections (Social Work & Administration and Health Sciences).

1954: A Society newsletter is started.

1960: A student membership category is created.

1961: The Gerontologist begins publication.

1970: GSA moves its headquarters to Washington, DC.

1974: The Association for Gerontology in Higher Education is founded as a separate organization.

1974: GSA is instrumental in the founding of the National Institute on Aging. (Read more on page 7 of the March 2010 issue of Gerontology News!)

1987: GSA forms its Task Force on Minority Aging Issues. (Read more on page 7 of the June 2010 issue of Gerontology News!)

1988: GSA begins its Interest Group Program.

1994: The National Academy on an Aging Society is founded.

1995: The Public Policy & Aging Report is first published.

1996: Geron.org opens its doors and brings GSA into the digital age.

1998: AGHE is incorporated as a GSA unit.

2010: In recognition of the Society's 65th anniversary, the GSA Innovation Fund is launched.