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Webinars - 2021 Webinar Recordings

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Webinar Archive

Applying the Science of Behavior Change to Intervention Development for Diverse Older Adults

November 15, 2021

The webinar speakers will present on how social and psychological factors shape health-related behavior change and will enhance attendees’ understanding of the issues by highlighting variations in mechanisms that create and sustain health behavior changes. In this webinar, attendees will:

  • Be exposed to various theoretical frameworks for behavior change, and how these have been developed and applied to diverse populations.
  • Hear examples of how various approaches can be used to improve behavioral interventions and healthy lifestyles for diverse aging populations.
  • Identify areas of needed research to better apply these principles to interventions for diverse older adults, especially for the development of interventions for Alzheimer’s caregivers.

Presented by:

  • Lisa Onken, PhD, Director, Behavior Change and Intervention Program, Division of Behavioral and Social Research, National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health
  • Jun Ma, MD, PhD, FAHA, FABMR, FSBM, Beth and George Vitoux Distinguished Professor of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago.
  • Michelle Carlson, PhD, FGSA, Professor, Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; core faculty, Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions..
  • Donald Edmondson, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, Medicine and Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center; Director, Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, CUIMC.
  • Fadel Zeidan, PhD, Executive Director, University of California, San Diego, Center for Mindfulness; Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, UCSD.
  • Vincent Mor, PhD, Professor, Medical Science, Department of Health Services, Policy, and Practice; Florence Pirce Grant University Professor, Brown University School of Public Health.

Presented in conjunction with the GSA 2021 Annual Scientific Meeting.

Integrated Census and Survey Data for Aging Research: An Introduction to IPUMS

October 26, 2021

IPUMS — formerly known as the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series — offers free, harmonized census and survey data from the United States and around the world for aging research. These data can be used to study many aging-related topics, including caregiving, social isolation, disability, health, families, disparities, and work. This webinar will describe the data available through IPUMS, highlight their applicability to aging research, and demonstrate how to use the online data access system to create customized datasets. The webinar is hosted in partnership with the Network for Data-Intensive Research on Aging initiative at the University of Minnesota’s Life Course Center.

Presented by:

  • Sarah Flood, PhD, Director of U.S. Microdata Projects at IPUMS and Associate Director of the Life Course Center at the University of Minnesota
  • Lara Cleveland, PhD, Director of IPUMS International and senior research scientist at the Institute for Social Research and Data Innovation at the University of Minnesota

Getting to Know the NVAC: Connecting the Immunization and Aging Communities

October 26, 2021

This webinar, Getting to Know the NVAC, will review the purpose and structure of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee – such as who is on the Committee, what and how they make their decisions, and why the Committee matters. It will also share ways to engage with NVAC on issues related to older adult vaccination.

This webinar was developed by The Gerontological Society of America with support from Pfizer.

Getting to Know the ACIP: Connecting the Immunization and Aging Communities

October 25, 2021

This webinar, Getting to Know the ACIP, will review the purpose and structure of the Advisory Council of Immunization Practices – such as who is on the Council, what and how they make their decisions, and why the Council matters. It will also share ways to engage with ACIP on issues related to older adult vaccination.

This webinar was developed by The Gerontological Society of America with support from Pfizer.

World Cafe: Current Research on Issues Related to Workplace Accommodation of Employees with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Early Onset Dementia

October 19, 2021

If you are a conducting research or are interested in discussing research related to workers who are identified as having mild cognitive impairment or early onset dementia, you are encouraged to attend! An informal format will allow participants to meet researchers from policy, engineering, business, occupational health, architecture and numerous other disciplines, who are conducting or would like to conduct research related to workers, organizations, technologies or government involved in these issues. The Café will be facilitated by members of a Canadian-Australian working group exploring a joint research agenda.

Presented by:

  • Arlene Astell, PhD, Professor, Psychiatry, University of Toronto
  • Jen Boger, PhD, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo
  • Catherine Burns, PhD, Professor, Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo
  • AnneMarie Levy, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Lazaridis School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University  
  • Josephine McMurray, MBA, PhD, Associate Professor, Lazaridis School of Business and Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Philip Taylor, PhD, FGSA, Professor of Human Resource Management, Federation Business School, Federation University Australia

Sponsored by the GSA Aging Workforce Interest Group.

Covid Conversation #4: How well did older people and the caregiving workforce, formal and informal, adapt to the pandemic?

October 12, 2021

The long-term care workforce, severely neglected before the pandemic, faced extreme challenges in staffing, access to personal protective equipment, and guidance to protect older people from a highly transmissible, often fatal infectious disease. This workforce is predominantly female, minority, and low income. This conversation will examine how well older adults and caregivers, formal and informal, bore up during the worst of the pandemic. Allied topics include community-dwelling older adults, resilience, long-term care resident experience, risk perception, and social isolation.

Presented by:

  • Karen L. Fingerman, PhD, FGSA, Professor, Human Development and Family Sciences, School of Human Ecology, The University of Texas at Austin College of Natural Sciences
  • Heather Fuller, PhD, Associate Professor, Human Development and Family Science, North Dakota State University

Unequal Prospects for Working Longer, Before and After the Pandemic: What Can We Do?

October 7, 2021

Older workers, especially those nearing retirement age, who had not recovered from the impact of previous recessions, have been even more adversely affected during the pandemic by both working conditions and the ensuing recession. Reductions in employment and earnings, increased early Social Security claiming, and reduced retirement savings have all been reported. Older workers exited the workforce in significant numbers, retiring in the first month of the pandemic rather than risk infection. Women, racial minority, and other ethnic groups have been particularly vulnerable to this upheaval. Concerns about the vulnerability of older workers to infection increased the risk of age discrimination for those who stayed. The goal of this webinar is to consider recommendations for employers and public policymakers to ameliorate the consequences of these recent shocks.Teresa Ghilarducci will present on “false assumptions supporting the ‘working longer’ agenda” with a focus on those most affected by the pandemic—women, and racial and ethnic minorities. Distinguished discussants will provide commentary that includes recommendations for mechanisms and processes for ameliorating the consequences of twin shocks—the pandemic and the ensuing recession—and for much needed new workplace-based research tracking the employer-employee relationship over time.

Presented by:

  • Jacquelyn B. James, PhD, FGSA, Director, Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work, Boston College School of Social Work
  • Teresa Ghilarducci, PhD, Bernard L. and Irene Schwartz Professor of Economics, The New School for Social Research
  • Mo Wang, PhD, Lanzillotti-McKethan Eminent Scholar Chair, University of Florida Warrington College of Business
  • Ernest Gonzales, PhD, MSW, Associate Professor, New York University Silver School of Social Work
  • Courtney Coile, PhD, Professor of Economics, Wellesley College

Presented by the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work in conjunction with the GSA 2021 Annual Scientific Meeting.

Addressing Issues of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion on the Job Market: Considerations for Job Applications, Interviews, and Presentations (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

September 30, 2021


Building on ESPO’s spring webinar, the fall webinar will focus on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion during the job application and interview process. Panelists will discuss how to incorporate your diversity, equity and inclusion beliefs, experiences, and vision into your written application statements, when answering interview questions, and when delivering job presentations.

Presented by:

  • Deidre Hill Butler, PhD, Director of Faculty Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging/Academic Diversity Officer, Union College
  • Sheldon D. Fields, PhD, RN, CRNP, FNP-BC, AACRN, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, Research Professor and Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion in the College of Nursing at Penn State University
  • Kristin Levoy, PhD, MSN, RN, OCN, CNE, Assistant Professor of Nursing at the Indiana University School of Nursing (IUPUI Campus)

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

COVID Conversation #3: What worked and what didn’t work for older people in our response to the pandemic?

September 28, 2021

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is under control for older adults at the moment: more than 70% of people aged 65+ years have been vaccinated, and their risk of COVID-19 hospitalization is down by 94%. But the path to this extraordinary accomplishment was not easy and the fallout from the earlier pre-vaccine period is still emerging. In this conversation, we examine false steps and creative hacks in the path to protect older people during the worst phases of the pandemic.

Presented by:

  • Liat Ayalon, PhD, Professor, Deputy Director, Chair of the Retraining Master Degree Program, Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work, Bar Ilan University
  • Brad A. Meisner, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology & Health Science, Faculty of Health | York University, Centre for Aging Research & Education (YU-CARE)

The Synchronous, Virtual Functional and Frailty Measurement in Research and Clinical Practice: Guidance from the Literature and Experts

September 15, 2021

Objective functional and frailty measures are a valuable component of clinical and research assessments of older adults. The reliance on telehealth and remote data collection during the COVID-19 pandemic has precluded many in-person assessments in the clinical and research settings. As such, many health care providers and investigators have been left to determine the feasibility of collecting functional and frailty measures remotely over video conferencing with little guidance on safe and standardized approaches for doing so. In 2020, the GSA Technology and Aging Interest Group undertook a project to summarize 1) existing evidence- or experiential-based recommendations for safely implementing objective functional and frailty measures during a remote clinical or research assessment; 2) existing evidence- or experiential-based recommendations for implementing subjective alternatives to objective functional and frailty during a remote clinical or research assessment; and 3) current findings into tip sheets for the synchronous, remote administration of functional and frailty assessment over video conferencing. During this webinar, we will share the results of this work which are relevant to clinicians and researchers who administer frailty and functional measures in practice or during data collection.

Presented by:

  • Walter R. Boot, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Florida State University
  • Brian Buta, MHS, Project Administrator, Johns Hopkins University
  • Margaret Danilovich, PT, DPT, PhD, MBA, Senior Director of the Leonard Schanfield Research Institute, CJE SeniorLife; Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University
  • Erin Harrell, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Alabama
  • Megan Huisingh-Scheetz, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Associate Director, Aging Research Program, Section of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, University of Chicago
  • Michelle Martinchek, MD MPH, Assistant Professor in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, MGH Institute for Health Professions
  • Carrie Nieman MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Pamela Toto, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA, FGSA, Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh

Sponsored by the GSA Technology and Aging Interest Group. Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

COVID Conversation #2: Did the pandemic deepen health inequities for minority older adults?

August 24, 2021

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic exposed great health inequities in society, including disadvantages for minority older adults. Minority populations face an increased risk of transmission, severe disease, and death, for example hospitalization is close to three times higher for minority persons than it is for white persons sometimes as much as three times higher than for the white population. In this conversation, we examine differences in people’s risk for COVID-19 based on race and ethnicity. What happened and what can we learn to address disparities?

Presented by:

  • Omar Yaxmehen Bello-Chavolla, MD, PhD, Investigador en Ciencias Médicas, Instituto Nacional de Geriatría
  • Seung-won Emily Choi, PhD, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Texas Tech University
  • Karen D. Lincoln, PhD, MSW, MA, FGSA, Associate Professor, Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, University of Southern California

COVID Conversation #1: How bad was the pandemic for older adults? 

July 20, 2021

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic was a particular challenge to older adults. In 2020 during the period before vaccination, COVID-19 was the second leading cause of death among people aged 85+ years and the third leading cause for people aged 75 to 84 years. Residents of long-term care facilities bore the brunt of these deaths, but community residents also died in intensive care units, lost important health and supportive services, and had their lives upended in almost every way. In this conversation, we examine the impact of the pandemic on older Americans, with a special focus on health and medical care.

Presented by:

  • Elizabeth (Betsy) White, APRN, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Health Services, Policy, and Practice, and Investigator, Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research at the Brown University School of Public Health
  • Andy Sharma, PhD, Public Policy Studies, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Chronic Insomnia in Older Adults: Epidemiology and Approaches to Assessment in the Primary Care Setting

July 16, 2021

In this webinar, sleep health experts present information on the value of detecting and treating insomnia in older adult patients in the primary care setting. The presentation addresses insomnia’s impact on various clinical outcomes in older adults and its relationship with other clinical conditions. Appropriate screening tools for primary care teams and key elements of an evaluation are discussed. Presenters also review a clinical case study to illustrate the webinar’s practical implications.

Presented by:

  • Elizabeth Galik, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, Professor, Chair of the Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing; Past President, Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association
  • Christopher N. Kaufmann, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of Epidemiology and Data Science in Gerontology, Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida College of Medicine
  • Adam P. Spira, PhD, Professor, Vice Chair for Research & Faculty, Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Katie L. Stone, PhD, Professor, Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco; Senior Scientist, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute

This webinar is co-developed with Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association (GAPNA) and supported by Eisai Inc.

Publishing in Humanities, Arts, and Aging

June 10, 2021

Scholarship in perspectives on aging from the humanities, arts, and cultural gerontology has greatly enriched our understanding of aging and the life course. It is a vibrant area for peer-reviewed publishing from many disciplines, and there has been a welcome growth in focus in journals on humanities, arts, and aging. This webinar will bring together the perspectives of the editors responsible for humanities, arts, and cultural gerontology in four journals to outline the vision, philosophy, criteria, and opportunities for publishing in their journals.

Presented by:

  • A. Mark Clarfield, MD, Section Editor, Ars Longa and Old Lives Tales, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
  • Kate de Medeiros, PhD, Section Editor, Humanities and Arts, The Gerontologist
  • Desmond O’Neill, MD, Section Editor, Geriatric Medical Humanities, European Geriatric Medicine
  • Aagje Swinnen, PhD, Co-Editor, Age, Culture, Humanities

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund, this webinar is of interest for scholars in a wide range of disciplines within and associated with gerontology and the humanities. Students, faculty, and researchers wishing to learn how to publish in the most appropriate journal in humanities and aging will find this webinar to be particularly enlightening.

Ways to Support Early Career Scholars across The Gerontological Society of America and Alzheimer’s Association ISTAART

Monday, June 7, 2021

Are you new to the Gerontological Society of America/Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization (ESPO) or the Alzheimer's Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment (ISTAART)? Have you recently completed your degree or are in the process of completing it? Are you looking for ways to connect with others in a similar career stage? If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, then join us for the webinar exploring how ESPO and ISTAART support early career aging and dementia researchers and practitioners. You will hear from early career scientists and learn of local and global opportunities to support early career scholars!

Presented by:

  • Darina Petrovsky, PhD, RN, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, ESPO Chair
  • Beth Shaaban, PhD, MPH, Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, PIA to Elevate Early Career Researchers Vice Chair
  • Naiara Demnitz, PhD, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital - Amager and Hvidovre, Denmark, PIA to Elevate Early Career Researchers Communications Chair

Addressing Issues of Diversity and Social Justice in Research and Practice: Lightning Rounds and Panel Discussion (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

April 23, 2021

This webinar offers information on how to address issues of diversity and social justice in research, practice and education. Our skilled panel of researchers, educators, and clinicians will discuss strategies to 1) identify and incorporate diversity and equity in everyday life, 2) ensure diversity and equity in research and collaborations, and 3) facilitate inclusivity in teaching and service. Attendees will gain strategies useful in addressing diversity and health equity in future research and clinical practice.

Presented by:

  • Adriana Perez, PhD, CRNP, ANP-BC, FAAN, FGSA, Assistant Professor and Senior Fellow, at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing
  • Andrew Porter, PhD, Assistant Professor of Public Health and an award-winning teacher at the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies
  • Rabbi Erica Steelman, MAHL, MPP, Chaplain at Horsham Center for Jewish Life
  • Kalisha Bonds Johnson, PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC, T32 National Institute of Nursing Research Postdoctoral Fellow at Emory University's Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing (Moderator)
  • Panelists' Bios

 This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Using BRFSS Data for Action and Impact (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Webinar Series)

March 5, 2021

Using public health data for impact is an important way to translate data into practice. Informing policymakers, systems, and environments is important to meet the needs of older adults, their caregivers, and the systems that support them. Presenters will hear about cognitive decline data that can be translated for use in public health policies and systems.

Presented by:

  • Matthew Baumgart, Alzheimer’s Association
  • John Shean, MPH, Alzheimer’s Association

Older adults often experience multiple comorbid conditions, including issues related to cognitive decline, which can complicate their health management and quality of life. This webinar series will describe population-level data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) relevant to older adults, with an emphasis on cognitive decline and caregiving-related issues. Data collected through the BRFSS can be used to track these issues and to inform public health professionals, policymakers, and other stakeholders about important aging-related health issues. Presenters will provide concrete examples of how these data have been used and can be applied to research questions as well as to real-world problems, including how they can be used to effectively stimulate strategic changes to meet the needs of the growing proportion of older adults. This 4-part webinar series is organized by CDC, in conjunction with the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting Online.

Analyzing and Interpreting Caregiving Data in the BRFSS (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Webinar Series)

February 26, 2021

Caregivers play an important role in caring for adults with health conditions or disabilities. This session will describe the CDC BRFSS Caregiver module, including its variables, structure, and interpretation. Tips for analysis will be discussed. User-friendly tools and resources will also be presented.

Presented by:

  • Erin D. Bouldin, PhD, MPH, Appalachian State University and CDC Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program
  • Benjamin S. Olivari, MPH, CDC Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program

Older adults often experience multiple comorbid conditions, including issues related to cognitive decline, which can complicate their health management and quality of life. This webinar series will describe population-level data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) relevant to older adults, with an emphasis on cognitive decline and caregiving-related issues. Data collected through the BRFSS can be used to track these issues and to inform public health professionals, policymakers, and other stakeholders about important aging-related health issues. Presenters will provide concrete examples of how these data have been used and can be applied to research questions as well as to real-world problems, including how they can be used to effectively stimulate strategic changes to meet the needs of the growing proportion of older adults. This 4-part webinar series is organized by CDC, in conjunction with the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting Online.

Analyzing and Interpreting Cognitive Decline Data in the BRFSS (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Webinar Series)

February 19, 2021

Cognitive decline in older adults is an important public health issue. This session will describe the CDC BRFSS Cognitive Decline module, including its variables, structure, and interpretation. Tips for analysis will be discussed. User-friendly tools and resources will also be presented.

Presented by:

  • Christopher A. Taylor, PhD, CDC Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program
  • Benjamin S. Olivari, MPH, CDC Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program

Older adults often experience multiple comorbid conditions, including issues related to cognitive decline, which can complicate their health management and quality of life. This webinar series will describe population-level data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) relevant to older adults, with an emphasis on cognitive decline and caregiving-related issues. Data collected through the BRFSS can be used to track these issues and to inform public health professionals, policymakers, and other stakeholders about important aging-related health issues. Presenters will provide concrete examples of how these data have been used and can be applied to research questions as well as to real-world problems, including how they can be used to effectively stimulate strategic changes to meet the needs of the growing proportion of older adults. This 4-part webinar series is organized by CDC, in conjunction with the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting Online.

Introduction to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data for Cognitive Decline and Caregiving (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Webinar Series)

February 12, 2021

This session introduces participants to the CDC BRFSS, including its structure, administration, and usefulness in describing important public health issues for older adults and their caregivers.

Presented by:

  • Lisa C. McGuire, PhD, FGSA, CDC Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Aging Program

Older adults often experience multiple comorbid conditions, including issues related to cognitive decline, which can complicate their health management and quality of life. This webinar series will describe population-level data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) relevant to older adults, with an emphasis on cognitive decline and caregiving-related issues. Data collected through the BRFSS can be used to track these issues and to inform public health professionals, policymakers, and other stakeholders about important aging-related health issues. Presenters will provide concrete examples of how these data have been used and can be applied to research questions as well as to real-world problems, including how they can be used to effectively stimulate strategic changes to meet the needs of the growing proportion of older adults. This 4-part webinar series is organized by CDC, in conjunction with the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting Online.

New Member Orientation

February 11, 2021

Are you a new member of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA)? Interested in learning more about your GSA member benefits? Join GSA’s Membership Coordinator for an interactive orientation on the services, programs, events, resources, and networking opportunities available to all GSA members. We want to ensure you are getting the most value possible from your membership. This webinar will help you become more connected with the GSA community and show you how to access member resources. This session will include plenty of time for your questions about GSA and our services.

Presented by:

  • Jontice Small, Membership Coordinator, The Gerontological Society of America

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