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Shannon Jarrott

Q&A with Shannon Jarrott, PhD, FGSA, from The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio.

jarrottMeet Shannon.

“Surround yourself with good people; go out and find them if they aren’t knocking on your door! It’s easy to get busy with our day-to-day tasks and a growth area for me continues to be connecting with others across disciplines and settings. A team approach characterized by honest communication is powerful as partners can push, pull, and encourage each other through challenging and mundane tasks.”

Q: How long have you been a GSA member? What GSA member benefit do you like best and why?
A: I’ve been a member of GSA since 1994. I joined as a student at Penn State and continue to enjoy the quality learning and professional opportunities the conference affords me and the students with whom I work.

Q: How has membership in GSA benefited you?
A: I benefit from gaining access to the latest research and other researchers dedicated to aging issues at the annual conference and through other outlets like the Interest Groups. I just attended the Reframing Aging preconference workshop in Boston and cannot stop talking about the ideas conveyed there and the evidence behind it. The values conveyed align so well with my motivation to support intergenerational programs. Just this week I led a mini-workshop on the framework approach in a doctoral course on theory of behavior change, and I am inspired to “reframe” my approach to a master’s level survey course on aging that I teach.

Another thing I value about GSA is getting engaged by regularly attending the BSS business lunch and contributing to Society efforts, such as nominating colleagues for Fellow status, serving on a GSA journal editorial board, and reviewing abstract and award submissions. It has afforded me the opportunity to build some new skills, and it has helped me feel connected to this rather large organization.

Q: How did you get interested in the field of aging?
A: I have been interested in the power of intergenerational relationships since I was in high school and enjoyed a close a relationship with my own grandmother. In college, I took an aging course with Carolyn Aldwin at UC Davis, and she mentored me in my search for a graduate program. I love that now I get to see Carolyn every year at the annual scientific meeting.

Q: Why is it important for other individuals to join GSA?
A: While almost all of us connected to university settings can access the top quality research published in GSA journals that are not open-access, membership builds a commitment to a home organization and conference. That’s what other gerontologists will likely find at GSA. In addition to the conference research presentations, resources like Mentor Match, Interest Group meetings and sponsored symposia, panels on NIH funding and the Health and Aging Policy Fellowship, and even the Journalists in Aging Fellows Program offer added reasons to join GSA and attend the annual meetings.

Q: Are you a member of a GSA Interest Group? If so, which ones?
A: I am a member of the Grandparents as Caregivers Interest Group. As AGHE builds a closer relationship as part of GSA, I also plan to join the Intergenerational Learning, Research, and Community Engagement Interest Group.

Q: What are your key responsibilities at your job?
A: As a Professor of Social Work at The Ohio State University, I have responsibilities for teaching and advising undergraduates through doctoral students and conducting research. Some of my service responsibilities are in the community, such as working with a shared site intergenerational center created through a community-university partnership. I also learn, serve, and build network ties through professional organizations such as the Ohio Association for Gerontology Education, Generations United, the National Adult Day Services Association, and, of course, GSA.

Q: What is your most memorable research/patient experience?
A: One of my most memorable experiences comes from challenges I faced when I realized that standard research training hadn’t prepared me to share ownership in a community-based research partnership. This experience pushed me to continue developing my community-based participatory research skills, which serve me well today as I continue to learn from and with my community research colleagues. Work with student research colleagues has been highly memorable and positive in my career.

Q: Do you have any tips for emerging gerontologists?
A: Surround yourself with good people; go out and find them if they aren’t knocking on your door! It’s easy to get busy with our day-to-day tasks and a growth area for me continues to be connecting with others across disciplines and settings. A team approach characterized by honest communication is powerful as partners can push, pull, and encourage each other through challenging and mundane tasks.

Always speak to the implications of your work. First semester doctoral students in my theory of behavior change course are frequently frustrated to reach the conclusion of a research article only to see that the authors believe that the implications of their findings are that “more research is needed.”

Q: Tell us a little about your most recent activities/accomplishments.
A: After spending many years studying community capacity building and identifying evidence-based practices for non-familial intergenerational programs, I have funding to apply these strategies to a critical community need – healthy food access. So often, youth and elders are viewed through a deficit lens, and I relish the opportunity to apply theory and evidence to demonstrate that they can be a resource to each other and broader society using intergenerational strategies.

Q: Have you had an important mentor in your career? If so, how did s/he make a difference?
A: Steve Zarit introduced me to adult day services research and, perhaps more importantly, offered a great model of supporting students with professional development opportunities; I continue to value that relationship to this day.

Want to ask Shannon a question? Contact her on GSA Connect!

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