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GSA Webinars

Health and Retirement Study: Biomarkers Data (Part 3 of 3)

April 24, 2018

This webinar provides an overview of the data resources on physical measures and biomarkers in the Health and Retirement Study. The first part of the webinar provides information on the design of the physical measures and biomarkers data collection (through dried blood spot) and the measures collected. It also describes the Venous Blood Study with guidance on accessing these sensitive health data and relevant documentation.

Presented by Amanda Sonnega, associate research scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study; and Jessica Faul, associate research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a co–principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, and affiliated with the Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging, the Population Studies Center, and the University of Michigan BioSocial Methods Collaborative.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

Non-Academic Careers in Aging (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

April 6, 2018

What are career opportunities outside of academia? Do you want to know how to remain involved and be actively involved in gerontology research and policy outside of university institutions? Join our experts in non-academic career paths, as they discuss their experiences in diverse gerontology roles and ways to explore potential trajectories for non-academic careers in aging, offered as part of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series.

Presented by a panel of professionals working in non-academic careers:
Mindy Baker, PhD, from George G. Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Centers, Inc. is the Director of Education, where she provides Specialized Alzheimer’s and Dementia Training to their team members and also to professionals in the community. She has more than twenty years of experience working with people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. She has a PhD in Applied Cognitive Aging Psychology and a Certificate of Gerontology from the University of Akron, in Akron, Ohio. Her passion is finding ways to make meaningful connections with people who have dementia and teaching others to do the same. Sonya Barsness, MS, from Sonya Barsness Consulting Sonya is a Masters-prepared Gerontologist with 20 years of experience in aging, primarily in dementia care and long-term care. As a consultant, she works with organizations to support elders, particularly elders with dementia, in living with meaning and purpose, regardless of cognitive or functional challenges, or where they live. Cynthia Dougherty, PhD, MSW, is the Director of the Office of Geriatrics and Interprofessional Aging Studies at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. In her current role, some of her major responsibilities include managing a number of distance education/professional development programs, advising health profession and other students interested in the field of aging, developing and maintaining relationships with community partners, and supporting geriatric and gerontological research.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Methodological Innovations in Gerontology: Advances in Psychosocial Research

April 3, 2018

Over the past decade, the data and methods available to scholars of aging, the life course, and human development have expanded tremendously, enabling explorations of new areas of study and more sophisticated investigations of questions at the core of social gerontology. Scholars working in the social and psychological sciences have moved beyond data resources focused on measurement of individuals at a single or two points in time, and instead investigate the experiences of individuals embedded in dyads, families, social networks, and neighborhoods, at multiple points in time. Technological advances have led to an increased volume of individual-, meta-, and macro-level data, necessitating the development and use of statistical techniques to appropriately model psychosocial phenomena.

This webinar highlights key features of the recently published special issue on methodological innovations in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, led by co-editors Deborah Carr and Shevaun Neupert. I-Fen Lin describes applications of the multiple-indicators and multiple-causes (MIMIC) model to intergenerational transfer and reporting bias, and Nilam Ram presents core concepts from each of his four papers in the issue.

Papers from the special issue discussed on the webinar:

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Health and Retirement Study: Data on Cognition (Part 2 of 3)

March 27, 2018

This webinar presents an overview of the data resources on cognition in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The first part of the webinar identifies and provides guidance on the measures that have been included in the core survey along with where to find them. It also describes the supplementary clinical study of dementia — the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) — and offers guidance on accessing these sensitive health data. The last part of the formal presentation provides an initial glimpse into a new data resource — the Healthy Cognitive Aging Project (HCAP) — that provided valid data on the presence of cognitive impairment and dementia in the U.S. population.

Presented by Amanda Sonnega, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her PhD through the Department of Health, Behavior & Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. She has lectured in the UM School of Public Health, teaching Psychosocial Factors in Health-related Behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

The Road to Boston: Mapping the Steps for GSA 2018 Abstract Submission

January 25, 2018

Be prepared to click submit on March 15 for the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting call for abstracts deadline. This webinar will enhance your knowledge and skills for submitting an abstract. Hear from the experts about the importance and process for submitting an abstract and how best to prepare an abstract for submission. GSA President and Program Chair David J. Ekerdt, PhD, FGSA, of the University of Kansas, and GSA Program Co-Chairs, Mercedes Bern-Klug, PhD, FGSA, of the University of Iowa and Sara Moorman, PhD, FGSA, of Boston College, will walk attendees through the ins and outs of the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting abstract submission process. John Beilenson, President of Strategic Communications & Planning, who has been advising scientists about communications for more than a decade will demonstrate how to make your submission stand out from the crowd.

Introduction to the Health and Retirement Study (Part 1 of 3)

January 9, 2018

This introduction familiarizes new users with the study including previewing available data, how to access it, and some tips on getting started with analysis. An overview of the study can be found in PubMed: Cohort Profile: the Health and Retirement Study (HRS).

Presented by Amanda Sonnega, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her PhD through the Department of Health, Behavior & Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. She has lectured in the UM School of Public Health, teaching Psychosocial Factors in Health-related Behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

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