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GSA Webinars

Approaches to Measuring Wisdom

July 11, 2018

Wisdom research is a fast-growing field, and more and more investigators, especially those studying aging, are interested in using measures of wisdom. A number of measures of wisdom are available that differ in conceptual background and measurement approach. After attending this webinar, participants will be able to select the measure of wisdom that best fits their research questions. A broad distinction is made between self-report measures and performance-based measures, both of which have advantages and disadvantages. In this webinar, we discuss general issues in the measurement of wisdom, give a detailed overview of the existing measures, and describe current and potential future developments. In addition to describing the current state of wisdom measurement, we hope to attract researchers who are interested in developing new, creative measures of this complex construct.

Researcher bios:
Judith Glück, Dr. rer. nat., is a professor of developmental psychology at the University of Klagenfurt in Austria. Her main field of research is wisdom—how wisdom develops, under which conditions it manifests itself, how laypeople define it, and how it can be measured. She studied psychology at the University of Vienna with a focus on measurement and item-response theory and was then introduced to wisdom research by Paul Baltes when she was a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. Thus, she brought her background in psychometrics to the field of wisdom research and has published several papers on how wisdom can be measured. Currently, Dr. Glück is editing a psychological sciences special issue of The Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences on new developments in psychological wisdom research and co-editing the Cambridge Handbook of Wisdom with Robert J. Sternberg.

Nic M. Weststrate, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Developmental Psychology at the University of Klagenfurt in Austria. His research examines growth and adjustment in response to challenging life experiences with a particular focus on the association between diverse modes of self-reflective processing and wisdom. Dr. Weststrate is an alumnus of the Wisdom and Identity Lab in the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the University of Toronto and a current member of the university’s Institute for Life Course and Aging.

Health and Retirement Study: Biomarkers Data (Part 3 of 3)

April 24, 2018

This webinar provides an overview of the data resources on physical measures and biomarkers in the Health and Retirement Study. The first part of the webinar provides information on the design of the physical measures and biomarkers data collection (through dried blood spot) and the measures collected. It also describes the Venous Blood Study with guidance on accessing these sensitive health data and relevant documentation.

Presented by Amanda Sonnega, associate research scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study; and Jessica Faul, associate research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a co–principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, and affiliated with the Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging, the Population Studies Center, and the University of Michigan BioSocial Methods Collaborative.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

Non-Academic Careers in Aging (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

April 6, 2018

What are career opportunities outside of academia? Do you want to know how to remain involved and be actively involved in gerontology research and policy outside of university institutions? Join our experts in non-academic career paths, as they discuss their experiences in diverse gerontology roles and ways to explore potential trajectories for non-academic careers in aging, offered as part of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series.

Presented by a panel of professionals working in non-academic careers:
Mindy Baker, PhD, from George G. Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Centers, Inc. is the Director of Education, where she provides Specialized Alzheimer’s and Dementia Training to their team members and also to professionals in the community. She has more than twenty years of experience working with people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. She has a PhD in Applied Cognitive Aging Psychology and a Certificate of Gerontology from the University of Akron, in Akron, Ohio. Her passion is finding ways to make meaningful connections with people who have dementia and teaching others to do the same. Sonya Barsness, MS, from Sonya Barsness Consulting Sonya is a Masters-prepared Gerontologist with 20 years of experience in aging, primarily in dementia care and long-term care. As a consultant, she works with organizations to support elders, particularly elders with dementia, in living with meaning and purpose, regardless of cognitive or functional challenges, or where they live. Cynthia Dougherty, PhD, MSW, is the Director of the Office of Geriatrics and Interprofessional Aging Studies at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. In her current role, some of her major responsibilities include managing a number of distance education/professional development programs, advising health profession and other students interested in the field of aging, developing and maintaining relationships with community partners, and supporting geriatric and gerontological research.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Methodological Innovations in Gerontology: Advances in Psychosocial Research

April 3, 2018

Over the past decade, the data and methods available to scholars of aging, the life course, and human development have expanded tremendously, enabling explorations of new areas of study and more sophisticated investigations of questions at the core of social gerontology. Scholars working in the social and psychological sciences have moved beyond data resources focused on measurement of individuals at a single or two points in time, and instead investigate the experiences of individuals embedded in dyads, families, social networks, and neighborhoods, at multiple points in time. Technological advances have led to an increased volume of individual-, meta-, and macro-level data, necessitating the development and use of statistical techniques to appropriately model psychosocial phenomena.

This webinar highlights key features of the recently published special issue on methodological innovations in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, led by co-editors Deborah Carr and Shevaun Neupert. I-Fen Lin describes applications of the multiple-indicators and multiple-causes (MIMIC) model to intergenerational transfer and reporting bias, and Nilam Ram presents core concepts from each of his four papers in the issue.

Papers from the special issue discussed on the webinar:

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Health and Retirement Study: Data on Cognition (Part 2 of 3)

March 27, 2018

This webinar presents an overview of the data resources on cognition in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The first part of the webinar identifies and provides guidance on the measures that have been included in the core survey along with where to find them. It also describes the supplementary clinical study of dementia — the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) — and offers guidance on accessing these sensitive health data. The last part of the formal presentation provides an initial glimpse into a new data resource — the Healthy Cognitive Aging Project (HCAP) — that provided valid data on the presence of cognitive impairment and dementia in the U.S. population.

Presented by Amanda Sonnega, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her PhD through the Department of Health, Behavior & Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. She has lectured in the UM School of Public Health, teaching Psychosocial Factors in Health-related Behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

The Road to Boston: Mapping the Steps for GSA 2018 Abstract Submission

January 25, 2018

Be prepared to click submit on March 15 for the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting call for abstracts deadline. This webinar will enhance your knowledge and skills for submitting an abstract. Hear from the experts about the importance and process for submitting an abstract and how best to prepare an abstract for submission. GSA President and Program Chair David J. Ekerdt, PhD, FGSA, of the University of Kansas, and GSA Program Co-Chairs, Mercedes Bern-Klug, PhD, FGSA, of the University of Iowa and Sara Moorman, PhD, FGSA, of Boston College, will walk attendees through the ins and outs of the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting abstract submission process. John Beilenson, President of Strategic Communications & Planning, who has been advising scientists about communications for more than a decade will demonstrate how to make your submission stand out from the crowd.

Introduction to the Health and Retirement Study (Part 1 of 3)

January 9, 2018

This introduction familiarizes new users with the study including previewing available data, how to access it, and some tips on getting started with analysis. An overview of the study can be found in PubMed: Cohort Profile: the Health and Retirement Study (HRS).

Presented by Amanda Sonnega, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her PhD through the Department of Health, Behavior & Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. She has lectured in the UM School of Public Health, teaching Psychosocial Factors in Health-related Behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.


NIA Outlook for 2018

December 18, 2017

Join the senior leadership of each program division within the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to learn about the 2018 outlook for aging research. Moderated by: Marie Bernard, Deputy Director of NIA. Panelists: John Haaga, Director of the Division of Behavioral & Social Research; Eliezer Masliah, Director of the Division of Neuroscience; Winnie Rossi, Deputy Director of Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology; and Felipe Sierra, Director of the Division of Aging Biology.

How to Use the GSA KAER Toolkit: A 4-step Process to Detecting Cognitive Impairment and Earlier Diagnosis of Dementia

December 13, 2017

With the number of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease continuing to grow (estimated at 6 million Americans in 2017), it is imperative that primary care providers conduct earlier cognitive impairment assessments to ensure that older adults receive appropriate medical care and referrals to community services that can often lead to improved health-related outcomes and well-being.

The online GSA KAER toolkit provides approaches and tools for primary care providers to kickstart the cognition discussion with their patients, to assess for cognitive impairment, to evaluate and diagnose dementia, and to provide post‐diagnostic referrals for education and supportive community services for persons with dementia and their family caregivers.

During this webinar, hear how the KAER model was developed, learn how to use the toolkit, and receive an overview of the approaches and featured tools to implementing each step of the KAER model.

Presented by: Richard H. Fortinsky, PhD, FGSA, Professor, UConn Center on Aging and Department of Medicine, Health Net, Inc., Chair in Geriatrics and Gerontology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; and Katie Maslow, MSW, Visiting Scholar, The Gerontological Society of America.

Supported by an independent grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

US Aging Policy — What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know

November 9, 2017, 2 to 3 p.m. EST

Think policy doesn’t affect the work that you do in caregiving/immunotherapy/oncology/technology/chronic disease research/long term care/fill-in-the-blank research? Think again. Join GSA Policy Advisor Brian Lindberg, MMHS, and a panel of experts who will discuss how debates that happen on Capitol Hill can impact you. The panel will take your questions live on everything from changes based on the new administration to how to get involved in policy. Featured speakers include Ellen Nissenbaum, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; Howard Bedlin, National Council on Aging; and Tricia Neuman, The Kaiser Family Foundation.

Trends in Aging

October 26, 2017

Moderated by GSA President Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FGSA, the four 2017 GSA member section chairs discuss top trends in the field of aging. The panelists discuss how issues such as healthcare, lifespan innovations, and long term care cross disciplines.

Educating Policymakers: Sharing Your Expertise with Capitol Hill

October 23, 2017

In this webinar for GSA and NAGE members, experts in the aging field who have testified on Capitol Hill share their perspectives on the process, preparation, and experience of testifying before a congressional committee.

Presented by:
Brian Lindberg, MMHS, GSA Policy Advisor (moderator); Kathryn Hyer, PhD, MPP, FGSA, Professor/Director Policy Center, School of Aging Studies/Florida Policy Exchange Center on Aging, University of South Florida; Janice Knebl, MBA, DO, Chief, Geriatrics Section and Dallas Southwest Osteopathic Physicians, Endowed Chair in Geriatrics, University of North Texas Health Science Center; and Frank Lin, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Geriatric Medicine, Mental Health, and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Aligning your Scientific Inquiry with Public Policy: Recommendations from Experts in Policy and Aging (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 13, 2017

Given the projected growth of the older population in the United States, researchers and clinicians are tasked to explore ways to promote the health and well-being of older adults through policy. A few examples of relevant policy issues include end-of-life care, elder abuse, long-term care and Medicare reform. Emerging scholars have the unique opportunity to influence policy and engage in important discussions with policy makers to advocate for the aging society. Join us for the eighth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series to learn more about best practices in aligning your work with the public policy arena.

Presented by:
Gretchen E. Alkema, PhD, LCSW, FGSA, serves as vice president of policy and communications for The SCAN Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, she was the 2008-09 John Heinz/Health and Aging Policy Fellow and an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow, serving in the office of Senator Blanche L. Lincoln. Brian Lindberg, MSW, MMHS, is the public policy advisor for The Gerontological Society of America in Washington, DC. Brian worked in Congress for ten years on the House Select Committee on Aging and the Senate Special Committee on Aging. Brian Kaskie, PhD, MPH, has served as a professor of health policy in the Department of Health Management and Policy at the University of Iowa, College of Public Health since 2000. He currently is working as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow with the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging (Senator Susan M. Collins).

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Respiratory Disease in Older Adults: Focus on RSV

February 27, 2017

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause infections of the respiratory tract, which in some cases may lead to serious illness or death in vulnerable populations, particularly among older adults over the age of 60. In fact, RSV has been identified as the second-most common cause of viral pneumonia in older adults, after influenza. Older adults are among those most susceptible to RSV due to immunosenesence, resulting in decreases of RSV neutralizing titers and cell-mediated immunity responses.  RSV in older adults additionally impacts the health and wellness of loved ones and caregivers.

This GSA webinar addresses the epidemiology of respiratory disease in older adults, immunology and aging — why older adults get respiratory disease, and how to prevent and manage RSV infections. Featured speakers include GSA experts R. Gordon Douglas, Jr, MD; Stefan Gravenstein, MD, MPH; and David Canaday, MD.

This webinar was developed by GSA and supported by Novavax.

Culturally Adapting Interventions to Promote Healthy Aging among Latinos: Best Practices in Research and Publishing (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 17, 2017

The older population in the United States is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. As minority populations grow and see longer life expectancies, researchers and clinicians are tasked to explore ways to promote the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minority populations. Given the growing diversity of the older population emerging scholars are uniquely positioned to focus on the health of minority aging population. In this seventh installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series, learn more about best practices in research and publishing in minority aging. 

Presented by Dr. Adriana Perez, PhD, ANP-BC, FAAN. Perez moved from Arizona to Philadelphia to join the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Nursing faculty in 2015. At Penn, she has the opportunity to strengthen her work so that it has a greater impact and is more sustainable across diverse communities. She is partnering with a pediatric nurse practitioner to develop an inter-generational physical activity program for seniors and their grandchildren. Perez is working with the National Association of Hispanic Nurses to teach multicultural families, particularly Latinos, about concepts such as premiums and co-payments, and the benefits of health insurance, so they can select health insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace and use it to stay healthy and save money.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.


More Than Just Memes: Using Social Media and Technology to Boost Your Career (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 14, 2016

Details: Social media and technology have changed the way many professionals find work, network, collaborate, and progress in their careers. Academic and clinical careers are no different. Numerous social media and technology platforms can be used for career development, networking, and research dissemination including, but not limited to, LinkedIn, ResearchGate, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. With so many outlets, it is important to know how to create a successful social media presence and use technology to your advantage. In this sixth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series, learn more about how social media and technology can boost your career.   

Presented by Melissa Batchelor-Murphy, PhD, RN-BC, FNP-BC, assistant professor at Duke University School of Nursing. She is a National Hartford Center for Gerontological Nursing Excellence (NHCGNE) Patricia G. Archbold Scholar (2009-2011) and Claire M. Fagin Fellow (2012-2014). She is currently a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar (2014-2017) and a project director for the Duke University School of Nursing’s NIH/ NINR P30 ADAPT Center (2014-2017). She uses social media to disseminate her research findings related to improving nutritional outcomes for residents with dementia in nursing homes, and inform clinical practice. Additionally, she uses social media as a viable means for networking with experts in her field, translating/disseminating the scientific achievements of her colleagues to the public, and developing her voice/ presence in the healthcare arena. In this webinar, she discusses how she developed a plan to increase her social media repertoire (as a nurse scientist, educator, and clinician), and her plans to advance this innovative means of disseminating her science to the next level.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

How to Help Older Adults Recover from Disasters

October 5, 2016

At present, most literature developed by policymakers and planners identify older adults as a vulnerable population that requires additional assistance and resources during disasters. However, it is a constellation of risk factors that make a person vulnerable. The effect of aging, vulnerability, and resilience on responses to disasters is both multidimensional and complex. This webinar provides practical information from the perspective of diverse practice settings (e.g., community-based programs, long-term care services) on how best to support the recovery of older adults after a disaster. This webinar describes best practices and organizational planning considerations related to the unique needs of this population. To highlight key issues, a case scenario is used to illustrate the importance of emergency responders, organizational response, and initiating relationships and partnerships in advance of an emergency or disaster.

Presented by:
Lisa M. Brown is Professor and Director of the Trauma Program at Palo Alto University in California. She received her PhD and MS in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and BS in gerontology from City University of New York. She is licensed in Florida and California and is board certified through the American Board of Professional Psychology in Geropsychology.  Dr. Brown’s clinical and research focus is on trauma and resilience, aging, health, vulnerable populations, disasters, and long-term care. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Agency for Healthcare Administration. She serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Aging and is a Fellow of Division 20 and The Gerontological Society of America.

Allison Gibson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Work at Winthrop University in South Carolina. She received her PhD, MSW, and BSW in social work from The Ohio State University. She is clinically licensed in South Carolina (LISW-CP) and Ohio (LISW). Her research interests focus on community-based services for older adults, particularly in the improvement of disaster response services for older persons, their families, and caregivers.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

How to Help Older Adults Prepare for Disasters

September 7, 2016

Among all age groups, older adults are the least prepared for disasters and have the highest rate of disaster-related deaths relative to the general population. This webinar provides information for clinicians, public health officials, emergency managers, researchers, social workers, and policymakers on how to best help older adults prepare for a disaster. Best practices and pre-disaster organizational planning considerations related to the unique needs of this population are discussed and methods to address concerns are offered. This webinar includes a case scenario to deepen group understanding and facilitate discussion.

Presented by:
Lisa M. Brown is Professor and Director of the Trauma Program at Palo Alto University in California. She received her PhD and MS in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and BS in gerontology from City University of New York. She is licensed in Florida and California and is board certified through the American Board of Professional Psychology in Geropsychology.  Dr. Brown’s clinical and research focus is on trauma and resilience, aging, health, vulnerable populations, disasters, and long-term care. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Agency for Healthcare Administration. She serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Aging and is a Fellow of Division 20 and The Gerontological Society of America.

Jessica Walsh is a PhD candidate in clinical psychology at Palo Alto University in California, specializing in the Trauma Program. She received her BA in social studies from Harvard University in 2010 and her MSc in psychology from the University of East London in 2013. She is currently a psychology extern on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Clinical Team at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Her research interests focus on trauma, aging, and resilience, particularly in the context of improving public policy to better respond to acts of terrorism, war, and disasters.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Strategies to Advance the National Adult Immunization Plan Through a Focus on Influenza

August 2, 2016

Learn about the National Adult Immunization Plan (NAIP) released in February 2016 by the National Vaccine Program Office, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Angela Shen addresses the four NAIP goals and key focus areas. GSA Executive Director and James Appleby shares actionable ideas generated by a multidisciplinary group to advance adult influenza immunization rates using the NAIP framework and key focus objectives. When it comes to saving people’s lives and reducing human disease and affliction, few interventions can match the record of vaccines. Participate in this one-hour webinar and learn ways to use the NAIP as a road map to create your influenza immunization strategy.

Audience: All professionals seeking to increase adult influenza immunization rates

Presented by:
Angela Shen, ScD, MPH, Senior Science Policy Advisor, National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO), US Department of Health and Human Services
James Appleby, BSPharm, MPH, Executive Director and CEO of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA)

This webinar was developed by GSA and supported by Sanofi Pasteur.

NIA 101: The Review Process (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

June 14, 2016

The NIA and the Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization of The Gerontological Society of America have collaborated to present the webinar “NIA 101: The Review Process,” featuring Chyren Hunter, PhD, from the NIA. This webinar will focus on each step of the grant application review process and respond to questions from the “virtual” audience. At the end of the hour-long webinar, you should have all the information you need to apply for NIA funding.

Chyren Hunter, PhD, is the deputy director and research training officer in the Division of Extramural Activities at the NIA. She oversees and coordinates a broad range of activities that support the review, funding and management of applications and grants to support research on aging.

A Balancing Act: Navigating Work and Life in Early Career (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 26, 2016

Emerging scholars and professionals face unique experiences related to building a successful career while balancing relationships and personal well-being. Training programs often provide useful skills for professional development, yet few of us receive mentorship on how to navigate personal challenges related to family, relocation, work demands, and the difficulty of saying “no.” This interactive webinar provides ESPO members the opportunity learn strategies for personal success while managing a full life of work, relationships, and self.

Presented by:
Daniel Kaplan, PhD, is a clinical social worker with expertise in mental and neurological disorders. He is an assistant professor at the Adelphi University School of Social Work. His research includes both intervention studies and workforce development initiatives to optimize care services, clinical interventions, and supportive environments for older adults with mental and neurological disorders living in the community. Kaplan is a co-investigator for the John A. Hartford Foundation-funded NASW Supervisory Leaders in Aging (http://socialworkers.org/sla/). He is the former national director of social services for the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. Kaplan holds clinical social work licensure in New York and Massachusetts, as well as an NASW certification in advanced gerontological clinical social work. He earned his doctorate at Columbia University and then held a postdoctoral research fellowship in the NIMH Geriatric Mental Health Services Research program at the Weill Cornell Institute for Geriatric Psychiatry.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.


Indigenous Aging Research: Current State of the Science and Future Directions for Research

October 30, 2015

The older adult American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is growing at a rapid pace. Statistics reported by the Administration on Aging reveal that the number of AI/AN adults aged 65 years and older in the United States is expected to nearly quadruple by 2050. Chronic diseases have a detrimental impact on this population, yet few research studies include AI/AN or indigenous populations worldwide. In this webinar, the presenters discuss studies funded by the National Institutes of Health and international research on indigenous populations, innovative practice-based programs, and the impact of colonization on the health of indigenous older adults. Future directions for research as well as novel approaches are also addressed. Speakers: Jordan Lewis, PhD, assistant professor, University of Washington School of Social Work and Indigenous Wellness Research Institute; Sarah Llanque, RN, PhD, scholar-in-residence, Frisch Institute for Senior Care, Florida State College at Jacksonville.

This webinar is supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Networking: Building Solid Career Connections for Emerging Scholars and Professionals (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 2, 2015

Throughout your career, the ability to network is a fundamental cornerstone to building strong professional relationships. Because networking takes place in various settings, both online and offline, and oftentimes even before an initial meeting, it is an essential skill to hone. Successful networking can advance your career in the field of aging through attainment of career goals, promoting collaboration and mentorship, and enhancing grantsmanship. Join us for the fourth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series to learn the ins and outs of networking and how to apply these skills during the upcoming GSA Annual Scientific Meeting in Orlando.

Presented by:
Jaime Hughes, MPH, MSW, doctoral student in Social Work and Public Health and a NIH Predoctoral Research Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill. Ms. Hughes has worked previously with the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC) at both the Ann Arbor and Los Angeles VA Medical Centers and currently collaborates with health services researchers at the Durham VA Medical Center. She is currently a member of the ESPO Executive Committee and will begin her term as Chair in November 2015.
Katherine Hall, PhD, Assistant Professor of Geriatrics at Duke University and Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Durham, NC. She is a Past Chair of ESPO’s Executive Committee and currently serves as the Communications Officer of the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Council of Student Organizations (IAGG-CSO).

This webinar is supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Post-Doctoral Opportunities: A Complete Look at the Spectrum of the Post-Doc Experience (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

September 18, 2015

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Office of Special Populations and the Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization (ESPO) of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) have collaborated to present the webinar “Post-Doctoral Opportunities: A Completed Look at the Spectrum of the Post-Doc Experience,” featuring Jamie Justice, PhD, from the University of Colorado, and Todd Ruppar, PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, from the University of Missouri. This webinar will focus on how to identify post-doctoral opportunities; how to make the most of post-doctoral positions; and the next steps to launch a career after the completion of a post-doctoral position. The speakers will address this content from an early career and more senior perspective, commenting on both clinical and academic opportunities.

Presented by:
Jamie Justice, PhD, is a Research Fellow in Geriatrics at Wake Forest School of Medicine working with Drs. Steve Kritchevsky and Carol Shively. Her primary research interests are to identify novel biological and behavioral factors that contribute to age-related declines in physical function and to test dietary, lifestyle and drug interventions with potential to slow the trajectory of age-related functional decline. Dr. Justice received her graduate training with Dr. Roger Enoka in the Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory and completed a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Douglas Seals in the Integrative Physiology of Aging Laboratory, both located at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Todd Ruppar, PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, serves as assistant professor and associate director of the Meta-Analysis Research Center at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. His research focuses on improving adherence to cardiovascular medications, and he has particular interests in adherence measurement and in how approaches to addressing adherence may impact health disparities. Dr. Ruppar is currently funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program, and has also had research funding through organizations including the PhRMA Foundation, and the John A. Hartford Foundation. As an educator, Dr. Ruppar teaches graduate courses on health behavior change and meta-analysis research methods, and undergraduate courses on public health nursing.

How to Gain Entry and Work with Older Adults in Culturally Grounded and Respectful Approaches

July 29, 2015

This webinar focuses on Dr. Lewis’s research experiences with tribal communities in rural Alaska and urban Seattle. The presentation discusses culturally grounded approaches to research with tribal communities, with an emphasis on community-based participatory research, and will outline recommendations for working respectfully and collaboratively with older adults in tribal communities across the United States. It also highlights the steps of beginning a research study with American Indian and Alaska Native older adults, from developing research questions to disseminating findings. Speakers: Jordan Lewis, PhD, assistant professor, University of Washington School of Social Work and Indigenous Wellness Research Institute; Sarah Llanque, RN, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in cancer, aging, and end-of-life care, University of Utah College of Nursing.

This webinar was supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

New Visions for Long-term Services and Supports: The Aging Network & the White House Conference on Aging

June 25, 2015

With the backdrop of the upcoming 2015 White House Conference on Aging, and the challenges of the evolving long-term services and supports (LTSS) system at the state level, this webinar looks to the lessons of the federal Commission on Long-Term Care and the innovations of the aging services network to frame the future for person-centered LTSS. Moderator: Brian Lindberg, MSW, MMHS, public policy advisor, GSA. Speakers: Larry Atkins, PhD, executive director, Long-Term Quality Alliance, and president, National Academy of Social Insurance; Amy Gotwals, chief of public policy & external affairs, National Association of Area Agencies on Aging; Nora Super, MPA, executive director, 2015 White House Conference on Aging.

Developed by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and supported by a grant from The SCAN Foundation — advancing a coordinated and easily navigated system of high-quality services for older adults that preserve dignity and independence. Additional support provided by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Nothing With Us Without Us:  Exploring Research Partnerships With Native American Communities

April 28, 2015
 
This presentation seeks to provide a basic overview of the opportunities and challenges in conducting human subjects research in Indian Country. T.J. Holland, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Cultural Resources Supervisor and Chair of the tribe’s Cultural IRB and member of the Medical IRB, will discuss issues such as academic freedom, cultural sensitivity, and best practices for potential researchers who seek to work with Native American communities.

This webinar was supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Sleep Health and the Appropriate Use of OTC Sleep Aids in Older Adults: Results from a GSA Summit

March 13, 2015

To engage national stakeholders in a discussion on OTC sleep aid use by older adults and explore strategies for improving safe use of these products, The Gerontological Society of America organized a National Summit on OTC Sleep Aids and Sleep Health in Older Adults. Key findings from the summit include the high prevalence of sleep disturbances and recourse to OTC sleep aids, the long half-life of these medications and possible next-day detrimental effects, frequent anticholinergic side effects and the need for concerted efforts by retail pharmacists and other providers to address sleep health in older adults. The webinar speakers include Steven M. Albert, PhD, of the University of Pittsburgh, Michael V. Vitiello, PhD, of the University of Washington, and Tom Roth, PhD, of Henry Ford Health Systems.

Show Me the Money! Grant Writing for Emerging Scholars and Professionals (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 20, 2015

Grant writing is an essential component of all phases (dissertation, post-doctoral, early career) of your academic and professional careers. Funding is competitive, but gaining skills early in your career can help you learn how to identify funding opportunities and assemble a competitive application. This third webinar in the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series offers tips for successful early career grantsmanship. Presenters: Laura Tonks Raffield, a PhD candidate in molecular genetics and genomics at Wake Forest School of Medicine and recipient of an F31 Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Institute on Aging; and Ruth Masterson Creber, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and the School of Nursing, and recipient of an F31 Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Institute of Nursing Research and grants from the John Hartford Foundation and Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation

This webinar was sponsored by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Medicare Annual Wellness Visit as Springboard to Detection of Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis, and Post-Diagnosis Support

January 14, 2015

The 2010 Affordable Care Act established the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) as an opportunity for Medicare beneficiaries to receive preventive and assessment services during visits with their primary care providers (PCPs). Detection of cognitive impairment is among required AWV services, yet no specific tools are mandated and no data are available regarding tools used for this purpose. This webinar explains these and related issues being addressed by the GSA Workgroup on Cognitive Impairment Detection and Earlier Diagnosis. The presenters will be Shari M. Ling, MD, and Katie Maslow, MSW.

This webinar was developed by GSA with support from Eli Lilly and Company


Non-Academic Careers in Aging Research (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

December 10, 2014

Ever wondered about career opportunities beyond academia? Want to know how to remain involved and influential in gerontology research and policy outside of university institutions? During this webinar, join GSA members Leland “Bert” Waters, PhD, and Tracey Gendron, PhD, as they discuss their experiences in diverse gerontology roles and ways to explore potential trajectories for non-academic careers in aging.

Navigating the Mentor-Mentee Relationship (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

September 3, 2014

The mentor-mentee relationship is essential to the development and success of scholars and professionals at all career stages. Establishing and cultivating a productive relationship can be uncharted territory for both mentors and mentees. This second installment in the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series addresses various aspects of the mentor-mentee relationship, including finding mentors, delineating roles and responsibilities of mentors and mentees across career stages, and managing potential challenges. Presented by Deborah T. Gold, PhD, Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Sociology, and Psychology and Neuroscience, and Keith Whitfield, PhD, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, leaders of the GSA’s The Mentoring Effect.

This webinar was supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Increasing the Odds that Your Manuscript will be Published (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 7, 2014

Feeling the pressure to publish? Struggling to know where to publish? Have questions about the publications process? For many new scholars, navigating the publishing path can be both exciting and intimidating. ESPO’s inaugural career development webinar addressed issues that often arise during the race to get published and provided guidance through this sometimes sticky process by highlighting common pitfalls. Discussion presented by Merril Silverstein, PhD, Professor of Aging Studies and Editor of The Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences.

This webinar was sponsored by the GSA Innovation Fund. 

Sleep Health and the Appropriate Use of OTC Sleep Aids in Older Adults

January 22, 2014

Nearly half of older adults experience disturbed sleep at least a few nights each week, and about a quarter of older adults report use of a sleep medication in the prior month. In October 2013, The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), in collaboration with Pfizer, engaged national stakeholders in a discussion on over-the-counter (OTC) sleep aid use by older adults and explored strategies for improving safe use of these products. During this webinar, join multidisciplinary experts to examine aging and sleep disturbances, the current state of OTC therapeutics for sleep disturbance, and pharmacist perspective on gaps in therapies and clinical practice.

Speakers include Steven Albert, University of Pittsburgh; Phyllis Zee, Northwestern University; Thomas Roth, Henry Ford Health Systems; and Michael Toscani, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy.

This webinar was sponsored by Pfizer as part of a collaboration with GSA to support GSA’s campaign to address OTC sleep aids and sleep health in older adults.


Understanding OTC Medication Behaviors of Older Adults: Research Is Needed to Better Understand and Promote Safe and Effective Use

September 25, 2013

Join three clinical and academic experts to explore the key components discussed during the April 2013 National Summit on OTC Medication Behaviors of Older Adults, including future research needs and practical solutions. Topics include OTC medication literacy, the perceptual and cognitive basis of OTC medication decision-making, the interface between clinical and family care in OTC medication use, and technologies to support optimal OTC medication use.

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This webinar was in partnership with the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA).


Learn What’s Happening with NIA Grants and Funding

June 9, 2011

GSA welcomed National Institute on Aging Director Richard J. Hodes, MD, for a discussion on federal budget constraints, their impact on NIA, strategies his agency is employing to address them, and a look toward the future. Hodes also addressed the institute’s tight payline (an agency’s funding cutoff point for grant applications), an issue of great concern to the research community.

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This webinar was co-sponsored by the Friends of the National Institute on Aging and the American Geriatrics Society, and was supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Advocacy Training for Take Action Week

September 13, 2011

In anticipation of September's Take Action Week, GSA's policy advisor, Brian Lindberg, led a conversation about how to advocate for federal research funding, and other issues important to GSA members. Lindberg discussed how to set-up a meeting with your Senator or Member of the House of Representatives, what to expect and how to prepare for the meeting, and the basics of communicating your message.

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Thinking Inside the Box:  A Strategic Approach to Message-Driven Posters

October 4, 2011

Scientific posters. You've seen them. You've created them. Now, it's time to look at them in a whole new way. GSA's Annual Scientific Meeting features several poster sessions, and many of you will have the opportunity to present your research and ideas to a large and varied audience. If you're interested in improving your poster and making the most of these sessions, join us for this interactive webinar featuring John Beilenson, president of Strategic Communications & Planning, who has been advising scientists about communications and their posters for more than a decade.

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Comparative Effectiveness in Older Cancer Patients: Age Versus Health Status

November 19 to 21, 2010

This series, recorded during GSA's 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting,  includes three sessions on topics related to comparative effectiveness research in older cancer patients. It is designed to create new opportunities for a broader national audience to discuss and provide suggestions of areas and questions that require comparative effectiveness evaluation in order to help both the provider and the older cancer patient.

Click below to access (with slides and transcripts):

The series was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and co-sponsored by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the American Geriatrics Society, and the GSA Research on Cancer and Aging Informal Interest Group.

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