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Equity, Justice, and Inclusion for Older Workers: Recommendations and Solutions, Part 1: Enhancing Economic Security for Older Low-Wage Workers

September 30, 2020

Older workers are an often overlooked segment of the low-wage labor force. In this webinar, Mary Gatta, PhD, will share the experiences of older workers in the United States hospitality industry, including the factors shaping what it means to grow old while working in economic insecurity such as facing race- and gender-based inequities, health hazards associated with work, and housing concerns. In addition, the ways that larger social and economic policies can fail this group of workers will be examined.

Presented by:

  • Mary Gatta, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology at the City University of New York–Guttman

Over the last two decades, the phrase “aging and work” has evolved from its status as an oxymoron to a well-understood reality. It is now clearly recognized that the three-legged stool of retirement security (i.e., employer-sponsored pensions, Social Security in the United States, and individual savings) is rickety at best. More people need to work beyond conventional retirement ages to sustain their financial security in the face of longer lives and growing expenses. This need is paramount for older adults in general, but even greater for low-income, racial and ethnic minority, and blue-collar older workers. While perceived and/or real age discrimination has been identified as a factor limiting options for older adults, less is known about factors that mitigate against such perceptions of unfairness and injustice. This two-part webinar series from The Gerontological Society of America aims to: (1) identify the challenges of underrepresented older workers in their efforts to obtain or retain employment and (2) identify strategies for overcoming those challenges for people who either want or need to work in later life.

Series organized by:

  • Jacquelyn B. James, PhD, FGSA, Director of the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work, and Co-director of the Center on Aging & Work at Boston College
  • Kendra Jason, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and member of the Steering Committee for the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work

Navigating the Job Market During and Beyond the COVID-19 Era
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

September 25, 2020

Are you currently planning to enter the job market? Are you interested in learning some ways to navigate a highly competitive job market during and post the COVID-19 pandemic? How can you use this time strategically to effectively prepare for the next steps in your career? The events of recent months have created dramatic shifts to life as we know it and early career scholars will find that it can impact their research, career plans, and where they will end up next. In this timely webinar, emerging scholars will learn how to overcome the challenges of a highly competitive job market and how to best set up for success. Webinar attendees will hear from two skilled professionals, who will share their experiences, lessons learned, and practical advice about how to effectively plan for and be most prepared for an increasingly difficult job market.

Presented by:

  • Justin Lord, PhD, MBA, CMA, FHFMA, Assistant Professor with dual appointments in the Department of Accounting and the James K. Elrod Health Administration Department, College of Business at Louisiana State University–Shreveport (LSUS).
  • Bei Wu, PhD, FGSA, FAGHE, FNYAM, Dean’s Professor in Global Health and Director for Global Health and Aging Research, New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting Online Speaker Procedures

September 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25, 2020

To help you become more familiar with the presentation (slides and audio) process for posters, papers and symposia, GSA offered a “How To” webinar multiple times the week of September 21 to 25. This 1-hour webinar will outline the GSA 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting Online structure, describe the various presentation formats, and explain the tasks required for presenters.

Presented by:

  • James Appleby, BSPharm, MPH, ScD (Hon), Chief Executive Officer, The Gerontological Society of America
  • Megan McCutcheon, MA, Director of Publishing and Professional Resources, The Gerontological Society of America
  • Andrew Alix, Meetings Coordinator, The Gerontological Society of America

Understanding the Value of Enhanced Influenza Vaccine Products in Long-Term Care Settings

September 17, 2020

There are many benefits to preventing flu transmission in long-term care settings yet only about two-thirds of nursing home residents receive annual influenza vaccinations—one of the best known preventive strategies. The COVID-19 pandemic has further amplified the need for effective infection control in these settings. Compared with standard-dose influenza vaccines, enhanced influenza vaccines are not only more effective in preventing disease in older adults, they also provide a higher return on investment. This webinar is designed to help nursing home administrators, infection control teams, and other long-term care staff to (1) understand the benefits of using enhanced influenza vaccine products in residents and (2) learn practical tips that can help leadership and staff consistently apply immunization practices.

Presented by:

  • R. Gordon Douglas, MD, Chair, National Adult Vaccination Program Workgroup; Professor Emeritus, Weill Cornell Medical College (Moderator)
  • David H. Canaday, MD, Professor of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University; Associate Director, Geriatric, Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center; Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
  • Sherry A. Greenberg, PhD, RN, GNP-BC, FGSA, FAANP, FAAN, Associate Professor, Seton Hall University College of Nursing; President-Elect, Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association
  • Barbara Resnick, PhD, RN, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing; Co-Director, Biology and Behavior Across the Lifespan Organized Research Center; Sonya Ziporkin Gershowitz Chair in Gerontology

This program was jointly developed by GSA, the Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association, and AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine, with support from Sanofi.

Common Data Elements for Workforce and Staffing in International Long‐Term Care Research

September 2, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has spotlighted the critical need to transform long-term care (LTC). Worldwide Elements To Harmonize Research In LTC liVing Environments (WE-THRIVE) is a LTC research initiative to identify LTC common data elements (CDEs) that can be used internationally to support older adult thriving in LTC. To date, WE-THRIVE has identified four key measurement domains: workforce and staffing, person-centered care, organizational context, and care outcomes. This is the second GSA webinar in the series on WE-THRIVE.

Addressing major challenges faced by LTC providers during the COVID-19 pandemic, the webinar will focus on the “workforce and staffing” measurement domain and the work completed by this WE-THRIVE subgroup of researchers. The presenters will describe the concepts and proposed CDEs related to staff retention and turnover, evaluating nursing supervisor effectiveness, and staff training, with insights and lessons learned during the pandemic. International research on LTC can valuably inform LTC policy and practice, and the proposed CDEs can facilitate data sharing and aggregation internationally, including low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The proposed CDEs address key challenges to support LTC workforce and staffing to support the delivery of person-centered care and the achievement of person-centered outcomes.

Presented by:

  • Charlene Chu, PhD, RN, GNC(C), Assistant Professor, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, cross-appointment at Institute for Life Course and Aging, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Franziska Zúñiga, PhD, RN, FEANS, Head of Education, Institute for Nursing Sciences, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Basel, Switzerland
  • Michael Lepore, PhD, Vice President of the LiveWell Institute, Farmington, CT, USA, & Adjunct Assistant Professor of Health Services, Policy, and Practice, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

Other entries:

Understanding Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Influenza, and COVID-19: Preparing for the Fall

August 31, 2020

Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, causes 177,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths in older adults each year. Those over 65, adults with chronic heart or lung disease, and adults with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Yet RSV remains underdiagnosed.

In this one-hour webinar, experts will answer questions about RSV and how to prepare for the fall, when influenza and COVID-19 will be co-circulating. Participants will understand RSV and its impact on older adults; the challenges of distinguishing between RSV, influenza, and COVID-19; and how to keep older adults healthy with so many respiratory viruses circulating, particularly in a long-term care facility. Speakers will address gaps in understanding and research opportunities, as well as what gives them optimism for the fall respiratory illness season.

Presented by:

  • Robin Jump, MD, PhD – Case Western Reserve University, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center
  • Lindsay Kim, MD, MPH – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Helen “Keipp” Talbot, MD, MPH – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

This webinar is supported by Johnson and Johnson Health Systems, Inc. Content is developed by GSA.

NIH Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS)
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series)

August 28, 2020

Michael Saag, MD, Principal Investigator, will present the CFAR Network of Clinical Integrated Systems (CNICS) cohort. CNICS, established in 2002, is a clinic-based research network that captures clinical management and outcomes from point-of-care HIV clinics at 8 CFAR sites. It is an open access research platform containing pooled, de-indentified, data from electronic medical records of over 36,000 PLWH that are linked to patient reported outcomes, geospatial, genetics, and ARV resistance data, all linked to biologic specimens. The platform is available to investigators worldwide with an approved concept proposal.

Presented by:

  • Michael Saag, MD, Principal Investigator, CNICS

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Other entries:

Reframing Aging: A Primer for Health Care Professionals

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

As healthcare professionals working on the frontlines of the Covid-19 pandemic, you are confronted daily with communication choices. Research by the FrameWorks Institute on aging and ageism shows that words matter. This webinar presented by the Reframing Aging Initiative will cover four ideas to keep in mind when talking about older people and health equity in health care settings during the pandemic.

Presented by:

Longevity Fitness: Financial and Health Dimensions Across the Life Course (GSA Momentum Discussion Webinar)

July 29, 2020

“Longevity Fitness” is the term used in the GSA report, "Longevity Fitness: Financial and Health Dimensions Across the Life Course" describing how people can thrive by matching their Health Spans, Wealth Spans, and Life Spans as they enjoy increasingly long lives. Transitions commonly associated with advancing age—work disruptions, physical decline, dementia—can be better managed when a person has planned for the social support, financial means, and health resources needed to compensate for aging-related physical and cognitive changes. As people age, chronic diseases accumulate and reduce the ability to carry out the necessary activities of daily life. When a person also is lacking in social support, financial resources, or access to health care, the result of declining functional ability is a downward and potentially irreversible spiral. Insecurities in life—including uncertainty about food, housing, transportation, health care, or safety—exacerbate this situation, leading people to live in isolation or poverty and to be unable to seek the interventions they need for maintaining health and ultimately their ability to take care of themselves. In this webinar, experts in the field will exchange ideas about the concept of Longevity Fitness and insights into positive aging across the life course. For more information on longevity economics and longevity fitness, see www.geron.org/longevity.

Presented by:

  • Peter A. Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, FGSA, Wayne State University, Institute of Gerontology
  • Mary D. Naylor, PhD, RN, FAAN, New Courtland Center for Transitions and Health, University of Pennsylvania

Supported by Bank of America.

Aging Native American, Rural, and Homeless Populations: Engagement and Advocacy During the COVID-19 Pandemic

July 22, 2020

The COVID-19 public health crisis is perilously affecting all sectors of life, including services for older adults. Most gravely affected by this crisis have been some of the most vulnerable among us—marginalized older adult populations. The impact of COVID-19 and the effectiveness of various responses among these disparate populations are seldom considered in a common frame and in relation to each other. This webinar brings together community and public health leaders and advocates in a facilitated problem-identification and problem-solving discourse about aging Native American, rural, and homeless populations with regard to the challenges and effectiveness of responses to COVID-19.

Presented by:

  • Carla Frase, Director, Blue Rivers Area Agency / ADRC
  • David Knego, MSW, Executive Director, Curry Senior Center
  • Donna L. Polk, PhD, MS, LMHP, Chief Executive Officer, Nebraska Urban Indian Health Collation

This webinar is organized by the GSA Environmental Gerontology and Rural Aging Interest Groups.

Hearing- and Vision-Related Practical Strategies for Clinical Research With Older Adults During COVID-19 Pandemic

June 24, 2020

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have had to quickly adapt protocols in order to collect data remotely or while practicing social distancing from participants of ongoing clinical studies. This is especially true for researchers with an older adult study population, for whom the virus poses high risk. Older adult study participants are more likely to have hearing or vision impairment, or a combination. The webinar panelists will offer practical strategies and supporting case studies to help health-system researchers address older adults’ sensory health needs, while advancing their research aims during the time of the pandemic.

Presented by:

  • Heather E. Whitson, MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics) and Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine (Moderator)
  • Nicholas S. Reed, AuD, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Bonnielin Swenor, MPH, PhD, Associate Professor, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD, Professor of Otolaryngology and Epidemiology; Director, Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Alan Stevens, PhD, Director, Baylor Scott & White Center for Applied Health Research

Social Media for Research Dissemination: Expanding the Impact of Your Research

May 12, 2020

Description: Social media can play a valuable role in both career development and research dissemination. This webinar is designed to provide attendees with an overview of social media platforms and strategies to effectively use social media to promote research and personal branding. Attendees will also come away with a deeper understanding of the neural underpinnings of social media strategies.

Program Objectives:

  1. To describe the rationale for incorporating social media for research dissemination and personal branding.
  2. To provide an overview of frequently used social media platforms.
  3. To provide an overview of social media use strategies and options.

Presented by:

Julie Marie Faieta, PhD, OTR/L, is a rehabilitation science researcher at The Ohio State University, a postdoctoral fellow at Université Laval in Quebec, and a clinical occupational therapist. Her primary area of research is the development and evaluation of assistive and pervasive technology-based interventions to address health span and quality of life in individuals with neurodegenerative conditions and caregiver populations. With a specific interest in Alzheimer’s disease and technology-mediated sleep supports, Dr. Faieta is investigating interventions that can be effectively implemented with persons at risk of disease development and across each stage of the disease progression. During her doctoral studies at The Ohio State University, she completed a minor in neuroscience to facilitate enhanced understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms and disease pathologies associated with neurodegenerative conditions. Dr. Faieta’s other activities include involvement in the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine’s Neurodegenerative Diseases Networking Group as chair of the Alzheimer’s Disease Task Force and as social media officer.

Leveraging Small Grants to Build Your Research Program
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

May 1, 2020

What are small grants and why are they important? Where do you find them? How can you use these grants strategically to further your research? If you are interested in learning how to leverage small grants to build your research program, please join us. Our skilled panel of professionals will present on how to find, apply, and leverage foundation and other pilot funding mechanisms to form collaborations, build a research program, and establish a productive career trajectory with a track record in funding. We will discuss the steps involved in this process, and our two skilled professionals will share their experiences and practical advice about how to make the most of small grants.

Presented by:

  • Jamie Justice, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, at Wake Forest School of Medicine, and she is the current Chair of the GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization (ESPO). Dr. Justice is dedicated to geroscience research, an emerging discipline that advances the hypothesis that by targeting the basic biology of aging, the incidence of multiple age-related diseases and functional declines can be delayed or prevented collectively. She works to translate promising geroscience-guided interventions to clinical trials in older adults. This work includes a clinical trial designed to facilitate U.S. regulatory approval for aging and age-related diseases as a drug target and clinical investigations on the biological aging process of cellular senescence. Dr. Justice’s work has been funded primarily through competitive internal pilot awards and funding through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute on Aging, Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Glenn Foundation, and American Federation of Aging Research. Dr. Justice is an engaged member of the interdisciplinary NIH-supported Translational Geroscience Network.
  • Amy Hoffman, PhD, RN, is a Professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Assistant Dean for the College of Nursing at the Omaha Campus. In 2018, Dr. Hoffman was awarded a 5-year, multistate, 3-arm randomized clinical trial from the NIH National Cancer Institute. Her program of research is focused on changing the face of postsurgical lung cancer rehabilitation via virtual reality–based exercise to improve symptom and functional status and quality of life. She consults with other disciplines to leverage her knowledge to design interventions for other oncology populations with multiple comorbid conditions to enhance symptom management and quality of life. The results of her research have been published in multiple high-impact journals and scientists are utilizing her methods and findings in other populations. She also designed and tested the Theory of Symptom Self-Management for application by clinical practitioners and researchers to empower patients to optimize self-management of symptoms using self-directed action. Dr. Hoffman’s research was awarded the Distinguished Scientist Award by the University of Nebraska Medical Center in March 2020. She will serve on the scientific review panel at the NIH (June 2020) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (April 2020).

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Why Reframe? Understanding the Significance and Tools of Reframing Aging and Reframing Elder Abuse

April 30, 2020

The Reframing Aging Initiative is a long-term social endeavor designed to improve the public’s understanding of what aging means and the many ways that older people contribute to society. Its sister project, Reframing Elder Abuse, aims to demonstrate how we can put elder abuse on the public agenda, generate a sense of collective responsibility, and boost support for systemic solutions to address elder abuse. This webinar will build understanding of both projects, discuss where they overlap, and build awareness about the impact of ageism on society.

Presented by:

  • Patricia M. D’Antonio, BSPharm, MS, MBA, BCGP, is the Vice President of Professional Affairs for The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and a board-certified geriatric pharmacist. Trish is responsible for developing and managing GSA’s relationships with other organizations in the aging arena and leading major Society programs and projects. D’Antonio directs GSA’s policy initiatives through the National Academy on an Aging Society, GSA’s non-partisan public policy institute. Additionally, she serves as the Project Director for the Reframing Aging Initiative and is a trained Reframing Aging Facilitator. D'Antonio received her Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, and received her Master of Science in Health Finance and Master in Business Administration with a concentration in health care from Temple University in Philadelphia. She completed a residency in administration and finance at The Philadelphia Geriatric Center.
  • Laurie Gibson Lindberg is the Project Manager of the Reframing Aging Initiative at The Gerontological Society of America (GSA). She has been a trained Reframing Aging Facilitator for two years. Laurie’s background is in health and aging policy and programs with an emphasis on advocacy. She has held legislative roles on Capitol Hill as committee and personal staff, directed educational programs at the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement, and most recently, at GSA, she coordinated the Dementia Caregiving Network and the National Research Summit on Dementia Care and Services held at NIH. Lindberg graduated from Cornell University with a degree in history and attended graduate school for health policy at The George Washington University.
  • Aly Neumann received her Bachelors in Arts in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. She has over 5 years of experience supporting public service organizations in communications, event coordination and internal operations. She has served as Project Coordinator for the NCEA’s Reframing Elder Abuse project for 3 years. She has conducted dozens of interactive professional presentations and technical assistance on applying evidence-based public communications practices on elder abuse.

Reframing the Response to COVID-19: Applying Reframed Language to Counteract Ageism

April 21, 2020

Many of us are concerned by the ageism exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this webinar, the presenters offer ways that we can respond using empirically-supported narratives developed by the FrameWorks Institute for the Reframing Aging Initiative and other projects to frame the public discourse on social and scientific issues. Review the webinar and slides to learn strategies for connecting COVID-19 and aging without perpetuating ageist tropes.

Presented by:

The Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol: A New HRS Data Resource

March 25, 2020

The Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP) is part of an international research collaboration funded by the National Institute on Aging to measure and understand dementia risk within ongoing longitudinal studies of aging around the world with the aim to harmonize methods and content to facilitate cross-national comparisons. The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) HCAP was designed to serve as a central hub for harmonization. The HRS HCAP sample includes 3,496 respondents who have completed a carefully selected set of established cognitive and neuropsychological assessments to better characterize cognitive function in older adults. This webinar will provide an overview of the design and content of the HCAP study followed by a question and answer portion.

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her doctorate through the Department of Health, Behavior, and Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. Dr. Sonnega has lectured in the UM School of Public Health on psychosocial factors in health-related behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.
  • Lindsay Ryan, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. She received her doctoral degree in Human Development and Family Studies in 2008 from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Ryan is an investigator on several ongoing research projects, all of which involve an interest in better measuring and understanding the processes by which adults change over the life course. Her research interests include investigating individual and contextual influences on well-being, physical health, and cognition across adulthood, with a particular focus on the impact of social relations. She has worked on the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) for 10 years, and is involved in the development and management of the cognition and psychosocial content within the HRS.

This webinar, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America, has been developed and is presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging. Visit GSA's YouTube channel for previous installments: Introduction to the Health and Retirement Study; Biomarkers Data; Data on Cognition; HRS Sample Design, Weighting, and Complex Variance Estimation; Psychosocial Data Resources in the HRS.

Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series)

February 10, 2020

This webinar presents a description of two large cohorts that use data from the U.S. Veterans Administration (VA). The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) comprises all HIV-infected (55,000) veterans in VA care from 1997 to 2017, each matched to two demographically similar uninfected veterans. The Veteran Birth Cohort includes all veterans born between 1945 and 1965 who have used VA care from 1997 to 2017 (4.5 million), encompassing person-time between ages 35 and 75 years. Both cohorts have complete electronic health record data, including diagnoses, procedures, lab results, medication fill dates, vital signs, and self-reported tobacco and alcohol use. This information is augmented with supplemental data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as well as the National Death Index. Several exposures and outcomes have been validated with chart review.

Presented by:

  • Janet Tate, MPH, ScD, Affiliated Principal Investigator, VACS; Member of the Executive Committee; Director, Biostatistics Core; Co-Director, Risk Index Workgroup; Co-Director, Liver Core

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Other entries:

The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS)/Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) Combined Cohort Study (MWCCS)
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series) 

January 30, 2020

This webinar presents a description of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS)/Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) Combined Cohort Study (MWCCS), including an overview of the two cohorts that comprise the MWCCS, the more than 25-year longitudinal case-control design (HIV+ and HIV-) and every-6-month legacy measures of sociodemographic, aging (e.g., frailty, falls, cognition), cardiovascular health, mental health (depressive symptoms), sexual health, and behavior data as well as genome-wide association studies and biospecimen resources.

Presented by:

  • Deborah Gustafson, PhD, Co-Principal Investigator, Brooklyn Clinical Research Site of the MWCCS

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Other entries:

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