close

A A A
Menu

GSA Webinars

Article Index

More Than Just Memes: Using Social Media and Technology to Boost Your Career (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 14, 2016

Details: Social media and technology have changed the way many professionals find work, network, collaborate, and progress in their careers. Academic and clinical careers are no different. Numerous social media and technology platforms can be used for career development, networking, and research dissemination including, but not limited to, LinkedIn, ResearchGate, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. With so many outlets, it is important to know how to create a successful social media presence and use technology to your advantage. In this sixth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series, learn more about how social media and technology can boost your career.   

Presented by Melissa Batchelor-Murphy, PhD, RN-BC, FNP-BC, assistant professor at Duke University School of Nursing. She is a National Hartford Center for Gerontological Nursing Excellence (NHCGNE) Patricia G. Archbold Scholar (2009-2011) and Claire M. Fagin Fellow (2012-2014). She is currently a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar (2014-2017) and a project director for the Duke University School of Nursing’s NIH/ NINR P30 ADAPT Center (2014-2017). She uses social media to disseminate her research findings related to improving nutritional outcomes for residents with dementia in nursing homes, and inform clinical practice. Additionally, she uses social media as a viable means for networking with experts in her field, translating/disseminating the scientific achievements of her colleagues to the public, and developing her voice/ presence in the healthcare arena. In this webinar, she discusses how she developed a plan to increase her social media repertoire (as a nurse scientist, educator, and clinician), and her plans to advance this innovative means of disseminating her science to the next level.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

How to Help Older Adults Recover from Disasters

October 5, 2016

At present, most literature developed by policymakers and planners identify older adults as a vulnerable population that requires additional assistance and resources during disasters. However, it is a constellation of risk factors that make a person vulnerable. The effect of aging, vulnerability, and resilience on responses to disasters is both multidimensional and complex. This webinar provides practical information from the perspective of diverse practice settings (e.g., community-based programs, long-term care services) on how best to support the recovery of older adults after a disaster. This webinar describes best practices and organizational planning considerations related to the unique needs of this population. To highlight key issues, a case scenario is used to illustrate the importance of emergency responders, organizational response, and initiating relationships and partnerships in advance of an emergency or disaster.

Presented by:
Lisa M. Brown is Professor and Director of the Trauma Program at Palo Alto University in California. She received her PhD and MS in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and BS in gerontology from City University of New York. She is licensed in Florida and California and is board certified through the American Board of Professional Psychology in Geropsychology.  Dr. Brown’s clinical and research focus is on trauma and resilience, aging, health, vulnerable populations, disasters, and long-term care. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Agency for Healthcare Administration. She serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Aging and is a Fellow of Division 20 and The Gerontological Society of America.

Allison Gibson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Work at Winthrop University in South Carolina. She received her PhD, MSW, and BSW in social work from The Ohio State University. She is clinically licensed in South Carolina (LISW-CP) and Ohio (LISW). Her research interests focus on community-based services for older adults, particularly in the improvement of disaster response services for older persons, their families, and caregivers.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

How to Help Older Adults Prepare for Disasters

September 7, 2016

Among all age groups, older adults are the least prepared for disasters and have the highest rate of disaster-related deaths relative to the general population. This webinar provides information for clinicians, public health officials, emergency managers, researchers, social workers, and policymakers on how to best help older adults prepare for a disaster. Best practices and pre-disaster organizational planning considerations related to the unique needs of this population are discussed and methods to address concerns are offered. This webinar includes a case scenario to deepen group understanding and facilitate discussion.

Presented by:
Lisa M. Brown is Professor and Director of the Trauma Program at Palo Alto University in California. She received her PhD and MS in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and BS in gerontology from City University of New York. She is licensed in Florida and California and is board certified through the American Board of Professional Psychology in Geropsychology.  Dr. Brown’s clinical and research focus is on trauma and resilience, aging, health, vulnerable populations, disasters, and long-term care. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Agency for Healthcare Administration. She serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Aging and is a Fellow of Division 20 and The Gerontological Society of America.

Jessica Walsh is a PhD candidate in clinical psychology at Palo Alto University in California, specializing in the Trauma Program. She received her BA in social studies from Harvard University in 2010 and her MSc in psychology from the University of East London in 2013. She is currently a psychology extern on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Clinical Team at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Her research interests focus on trauma, aging, and resilience, particularly in the context of improving public policy to better respond to acts of terrorism, war, and disasters.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Strategies to Advance the National Adult Immunization Plan Through a Focus on Influenza

August 2, 2016

Learn about the National Adult Immunization Plan (NAIP) released in February 2016 by the National Vaccine Program Office, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Angela Shen addresses the four NAIP goals and key focus areas. GSA Executive Director and James Appleby shares actionable ideas generated by a multidisciplinary group to advance adult influenza immunization rates using the NAIP framework and key focus objectives. When it comes to saving people’s lives and reducing human disease and affliction, few interventions can match the record of vaccines. Participate in this one-hour webinar and learn ways to use the NAIP as a road map to create your influenza immunization strategy.

Audience: All professionals seeking to increase adult influenza immunization rates

Presented by:
Angela Shen, ScD, MPH, Senior Science Policy Advisor, National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO), US Department of Health and Human Services
James Appleby, BSPharm, MPH, Executive Director and CEO of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA)

This webinar was developed by GSA and supported by Sanofi Pasteur.

NIA 101: The Review Process (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

June 14, 2016

The NIA and the Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization of The Gerontological Society of America have collaborated to present the webinar “NIA 101: The Review Process,” featuring Chyren Hunter, PhD, from the NIA. This webinar will focus on each step of the grant application review process and respond to questions from the “virtual” audience. At the end of the hour-long webinar, you should have all the information you need to apply for NIA funding.

Chyren Hunter, PhD, is the deputy director and research training officer in the Division of Extramural Activities at the NIA. She oversees and coordinates a broad range of activities that support the review, funding and management of applications and grants to support research on aging.

A Balancing Act: Navigating Work and Life in Early Career (GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 26, 2016

Emerging scholars and professionals face unique experiences related to building a successful career while balancing relationships and personal well-being. Training programs often provide useful skills for professional development, yet few of us receive mentorship on how to navigate personal challenges related to family, relocation, work demands, and the difficulty of saying “no.” This interactive webinar provides ESPO members the opportunity learn strategies for personal success while managing a full life of work, relationships, and self.

Presented by:
Daniel Kaplan, PhD, is a clinical social worker with expertise in mental and neurological disorders. He is an assistant professor at the Adelphi University School of Social Work. His research includes both intervention studies and workforce development initiatives to optimize care services, clinical interventions, and supportive environments for older adults with mental and neurological disorders living in the community. Kaplan is a co-investigator for the John A. Hartford Foundation-funded NASW Supervisory Leaders in Aging (http://socialworkers.org/sla/). He is the former national director of social services for the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. Kaplan holds clinical social work licensure in New York and Massachusetts, as well as an NASW certification in advanced gerontological clinical social work. He earned his doctorate at Columbia University and then held a postdoctoral research fellowship in the NIMH Geriatric Mental Health Services Research program at the Weill Cornell Institute for Geriatric Psychiatry.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Share This Page!

Print Page