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Upcoming Webinars

Reframing Aging: A Primer for Health Care Professionals

Wednesday, August 12, 2020
2 to 3 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members and non-members

As healthcare professionals working on the frontlines of the Covid-19 pandemic, you are confronted daily with communication choices. Research by the FrameWorks Institute on aging and ageism shows that words matter. This webinar presented by the Reframing Aging Initiative will cover four ideas to keep in mind when talking about older people and health equity in health care settings during the pandemic.

Presented by:

NIH Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS)
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series)

Friday, August 28, 2020
12 to 1 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members; $25 for nonmembers

Michael Saag, MD, Principal Investigator, will present the CFAR Network of Clinical Integrated Systems (CNICS) cohort. CNICS, established in 2002, is a clinic-based research network that captures clinical management and outcomes from point-of-care HIV clinics at 8 CFAR sites. It is an open access research platform containing pooled, de-indentified, data from electronic medical records of over 36,000 PLWH that are linked to patient reported outcomes, geospatial, genetics, and ARV resistance data, all linked to biologic specimens. The platform is available to investigators worldwide with an approved concept proposal.

Presented by:

  • Michael Saag, MD, Principal Investigator, CNICS

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Other entries:

Understanding Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Influenza, and COVID-19: Preparing for the Fall

Monday, August 31, 2020
12 to 1 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members and non-members

Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, causes 177,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths in older adults each year. Those over 65, adults with chronic heart or lung disease, and adults with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Yet RSV remains underdiagnosed.
In this one-hour webinar, experts will answer questions about RSV and how to prepare for the fall, when influenza and COVID-19 will be co-circulating. Participants will understand RSV and its impact on older adults; the challenges of distinguishing between RSV, influenza, and COVID-19; and how to keep older adults healthy with so many respiratory viruses circulating, particularly in a long-term care facility. Speakers will address gaps in understanding and research opportunities, as well as what gives them optimism for the fall respiratory illness season.

Presented by:

  • Robin Jump, MD, PhD – Case Western Reserve University, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center
  • Lindsay Kim, MD, MPH – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Helen “Keipp” Talbot, MD, MPH – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

This webinar is supported by Johnson and Johnson Health Systems, Inc. Content is developed by GSA.

Common Data Elements for Workforce and Staffing in International Long‐Term Care Research

Wednesday, September 2, 2020
12 p.m. ET/6 p.m. Switzerland/Central European Time
See registration instructions above
Free for members; $25 for nonmembers

The COVID-19 pandemic has spotlighted the critical need to transform long-term care (LTC). Worldwide Elements To Harmonize Research In LTC liVing Environments (WE-THRIVE) is a LTC research initiative to identify LTC common data elements (CDEs) that can be used internationally to support older adult thriving in LTC. To date, WE-THRIVE has identified four key measurement domains: workforce and staffing, person-centered care, organizational context, and care outcomes. This is the second GSA webinar in the series on WE-THRIVE.

Addressing major challenges faced by LTC providers during the COVID-19 pandemic, the webinar will focus on the “workforce and staffing” measurement domain and the work completed by this WE-THRIVE subgroup of researchers. The presenters will describe the concepts and proposed CDEs related to staff retention and turnover, evaluating nursing supervisor effectiveness, and staff training, with insights and lessons learned during the pandemic. International research on LTC can valuably inform LTC policy and practice, and the proposed CDEs can facilitate data sharing and aggregation internationally, including low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The proposed CDEs address key challenges to support LTC workforce and staffing to support the delivery of person-centered care and the achievement of person-centered outcomes.

Presented by:

Charlene Chu, PhD, RN, GNC(C), Assistant Professor, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, cross-appointment at Institute for Life Course and Aging, University of Toronto, Canada

Franziska Zúñiga, PhD, RN, FEANS, Head of Education, Institute for Nursing Sciences, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Basel, Switzerland

Michael Lepore, PhD, Vice President of the LiveWell Institute, Farmington, CT, USA, & Adjunct Assistant Professor of Health Services, Policy, and Practice, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

Navigating the Job Market During and Beyond the COVID-19 Era
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

Friday, September 25, 2020
12 to 1 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members; $25 for nonmembers

Are you currently planning to enter the job market? Are you interested in learning some ways to navigate a highly competitive job market during and post the COVID-19 pandemic? How can you use this time strategically to effectively prepare for the next steps in your career? The events of recent months have created dramatic shifts to life as we know it and early career scholars will find that it can impact their research, career plans, and where they will end up next. In this timely webinar, emerging scholars will learn how to overcome the challenges of a highly competitive job market and how to best set up for success. Webinar attendees will hear from two skilled professionals, who will share their experiences, lessons learned, and practical advice about how to effectively plan for and be most prepared for an increasingly difficult job market.

Presented by:

  • Justin Lord, PhD, MBA, CMA, FHFMA, is Assistant Professor with dual appointments in the Department of Accounting and the James K. Elrod Health Administration Department in the College of Business at Louisiana State University–Shreveport (LSUS). He earned his doctoral degree in Health Services Administration from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and an MBA from Jacksonville State University. Dr. Lord is a Certified Managerial Accountant and a Fellow of the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Previously, he worked for several years as the Finance Director for a multi-state healthcare not-for-profit and at Honda Manufacturing as a Financial Analyst. His research focuses primarily on the financial management of long-term care organizations and he has been published in Health Care Management Review; INQUIRY–The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing; Journal of Healthcare Finance; and Applied Research in Quality of Life. In 2016, he was awarded the Ruth L. Kirchstein National Service Award by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. In his first year of teaching at LSUS, Dr. Lord was awarded Professor of the Year by the student body, and in his second year he was awarded the Outstanding Faculty Award in Teaching by his colleagues.
  • Bei Wu, PhD, FGSA, FAGHE, FNYAM, is Dean’s Professor in Global Health and Director for Global Health and Aging Research at the New York University (NYU) Rory Meyers College of Nursing. She is also Co-Director of the NYU Aging Incubator, Director for Research at the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, and Co-Director of the Research and Education Core on the National Institute on Aging–funded Asian Resources Center for Minority Aging Research. As Principal Investigator, she has led a significant number of projects supported by federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Currently, she is leading an NIH-funded clinical trial to improve oral health for persons with mild dementia. Her extensive publications cover topics related to oral health, long-term care, dementia, and caregiving. Dr. Wu is an internationally known leader in gerontology. Her career in gerontology is distinguished by interdisciplinary collaborations with researchers in various disciplines. She is a Fellow of The Gerontological Society of America, Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, and the New York Academy of Medicine. She is also an Honorary Member of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International. For the past two decades, she has successfully mentored several dozens of junior faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students in the United States and abroad.

Pre-registration is required. Please contact ESPO at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for further information. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Tweet with us live during the webinar using #espocareers for even more tips and Q&A.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Part I: Enhancing Economic Security for Older Low-Wage Workers (Equity, Justice, and Inclusion for Older Workers: Recommendations and Solutions Series)

Wednesday, September 30, 2020
12 to 1 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members; $25 for nonmembers

Older workers are an often overlooked segment of the low-wage labor force. In this webinar, Mary Gatta, PhD, will share the experiences of older workers in the United States hospitality industry, including the factors shaping what it means to grow old while working in economic insecurity such as facing race- and gender-based inequities, health hazards associated with work, and housing concerns. In addition, the ways that larger social and economic policies can fail this group of workers will be examined. Following the presentation, Dr. Gatta will lead a discussion focusing on ways to improve the economic security and working conditions of older low-wage workers.

Presented by:

  • Mary Gatta, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology at the City University of New York–Guttman

Over the last two decades, the phrase “aging and work” has evolved from its status as an oxymoron to a well-understood reality. It is now clearly recognized that the three-legged stool of retirement security (i.e., employer-sponsored pensions, Social Security in the United States, and individual savings) is rickety at best. More people need to work beyond conventional retirement ages to sustain their financial security in the face of longer lives and growing expenses. This need is paramount for older adults in general, but even greater for low-income, racial and ethnic minority, and blue-collar older workers. While perceived and/or real age discrimination has been identified as a factor limiting options for older adults, less is known about factors that mitigate against such perceptions of unfairness and injustice. This two-part webinar series from The Gerontological Society of America aims to: (1) identify the challenges of underrepresented older workers in their efforts to obtain or retain employment and (2) identify strategies for overcoming those challenges for people who either want or need to work in later life.

Series organized by:

  • Jacquelyn B. James, PhD, FGSA, Director of the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work, and Co-director of the Center on Aging & Work at Boston College
  • Kendra Jason, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and member of the Steering Committee for the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work.

University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and Collaborating Sites Data Sources
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series)

Wednesday, October 14, 2020
12 to 1 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members; $25 for nonmembers

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

Presented by:

  • Robert Heaton, PhD, ABPP-CN Director, HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center; Co-PI, CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research Study; Co-Investigator, Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center, Behavioral Assessment Core
  • Scott Letendre, MD Co-Director, HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center; Co-PI, CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research Study; Co-Investigator, Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center, Behavioral Assessment Core
  • Jennifer Iudicello, PhD Center Manager, HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center; Co-Investigator, Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center, Behavioral Assessment Core; Principal Investigator, Identification of Biomarkers of CNS Injury and Resilience related to HIV-1 and Methamphetamine
  • David Moore, PhD Principal Investigator, California NeuroAIDS Tissue Network; Chair, Neuropsychology Workgroup, National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium; Co-PI, Multi-Dimensional Successful Aging Among HIV-Infected Adults

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Part II: Systems of Inequality Affecting Older Workers (Equity, Justice, and Inclusion for Older Workers: Recommendations and Solutions Series)

Thursday October 29, 2020
12 to 1 p.m. ET
See registration instructions above
Free for members; $25 for nonmembers

Topic 1: Identifying Malleable Barriers to Engage Underserved Minority Middle-Aged and Older Adult Learners in Adult Educational Opportunities
Despite the growing need for adult education and training opportunities globally, opportunities to engage in adult education and training are most often pursued by higher-income or higher-skilled adults. Engaging and retaining adult learners in education and training among underserved racial/ethnic minority middle-aged and older adults are often challenging due to the structural barriers (e.g., program costs). This segment of the webinar will describe a study whose purpose was to identify barriers to engaging and retaining adult learners among underserved minority middle-aged and older adult groups. Through semi-structured interviews, data were collected from 60 key informants representing Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy, Norway, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Deductive qualitative descriptive methods revealed the need for recruitment efforts tailored to support adult workers, while also emphasizing the importance of multiple learning forms, including formal, nonformal, and informal learning. The presenters will provide recommendations to promote the inclusion of underserved subpopulations in learning opportunities.

Presented by:

  • Nytasia Hicks, MSW, PhD candidate in the Social Gerontology Program at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
  • Phyllis A. Cummins, PhD, Senior Research Scholar at Scripps Gerontology Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
  • Takashi Yamashita, PhD, MPH, MA, Associate Professor of Sociology and faculty in the Doctoral Program in Gerontology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Topic 2: Older Adult Peer Specialists’ Role in Offsetting the Impact of Social Distancing During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Older adults with mental health conditions experience disproportionate risk from the COVID-19 pandemic and are more likely to have been homeless, to reside in a group setting, or to have been cared for at nursing facilities. Increasing fear during the pandemic can lead to gaps in communication and delays in medical care, particularly when isolated from community advocates. Older adult peer specialists are a Medicaid reimbursable workforce with a lived experience of aging with mental health issues; they have shown to improve clinical outcomes such as feelings of loneliness as well as behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety—all of which are on the rise due to COVID-19. During the COVID-19 pandemic, older adult peer specialists are using technology to deliver digital peer support services related to addressing both the mental health and physical health needs of older adults. With the projected increase in behavioral health problems resulting from the pandemic, policies need to be created to incorporate older adult peer specialists into the existing workforce of behavioral health providers.

Presented by:

  • Mbita Mbao, LICSW, PhD candidate in the School of Social Work at Simmons University
  • Karen L. Fortuna, PhD, LICSW, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Dartmouth College

Topic 3: Microlearning for Low-Wage Workers in Nursing Homes
Direct care work in nursing homes is characterized by low wages, few benefits, heavy workloads, high rates of injury, and few opportunities for advancement. Because nursing homes are fast-paced environments that are faced with both rising acuity of residents (e.g., increasing numbers of residents with dementia) and high rates of staff turnover and “working short,” the time and resources for education and training are limited. Additionally, the women of color and immigrants, who comprise the majority of the direct care workforce, struggle with barriers to education, including low educational attainment, poor quality secondary education, foreign credentials, second jobs, and English fluency problems. Further, mid-level workers in nursing homes—licensed practical and registered nurses—require higher level credentialing that is out of reach for the majority of direct care workers. While it is clear that these workers need access to continuing education and diverse educational and career pathways, delivering this education requires innovation and creativity to address multiple layers of barriers. This segment of the webinar will discuss data from a statewide survey of nursing home staff and will provide access to microlearning videos aimed at supporting educators within nursing centers to fit learning into short huddles and in-service opportunities within these fast-paced environments. The presenters will discuss their research findings that suggest direct care workers are open to additional training but face persistent barriers to accessing and accruing rewards to training.

Presented by:

  • Jennifer Craft Morgan, PhD, Associate Professor at the Gerontology Institute at Georgia State University
  • Elisabeth O. Burgess, PhD, FGSA, Director of the Gerontology Institute at Georgia State University, and Professor of Gerontology and Sociology.

Over the last two decades, the phrase “aging and work” has evolved from its status as an oxymoron to a well-understood reality. It is now clearly recognized that the three-legged stool of retirement security (i.e., employer-sponsored pensions, Social Security in the United States, and individual savings) is rickety at best. More people need to work beyond conventional retirement ages to sustain their financial security in the face of longer lives and growing expenses. This need is paramount for older adults in general, but even greater for low-income, racial and ethnic minority, and blue-collar older workers. While perceived and/or real age discrimination has been identified as a factor limiting options for older adults, less is known about factors that mitigate against such perceptions of unfairness and injustice. This two-part webinar series from The Gerontological Society of America aims to: (1) identify the challenges of underrepresented older workers in their efforts to obtain or retain employment and (2) identify strategies for overcoming those challenges for people who either want or need to work in later life.

Series organized by:

  • Jacquelyn B. James, PhD, FGSA, Director of the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work, and Co-director of the Center on Aging & Work at Boston College
  • Kendra Jason, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and member of the Steering Committee for the Sloan Research Network on Aging & Work.

NIH National Institute on Aging (NIA) Funding Opportunities and Data Sources
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series)

Coming in 2020

This webinar will provide information about existing publicly available NIA data sources for conducting secondary research related to HIV and aging, including information about several cross-national longitudinal studies in addition to U.S. data sources. The presenters also will discuss current NIA funding opportunities in HIV and aging research with an emphasis on those that relate to secondary data.

Presented by:

  • Marcia Holstad, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, Co-Director, Emory CFAR HIV and Aging Scientific Working Group; Emory Co-Lead, NIH Inter CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group
  • Molly M. Perkins, PhD, Co-Director, Emory CFAR HIV and Aging Scientific Working Group; Emory Co-Lead, NIH Inter CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group

Longevity Fitness: Financial and Health Dimensions Across the Life Course (GSA Momentum Discussion Webinar)

July 29, 2020

“Longevity Fitness” is the term used in the GSA report, "Longevity Fitness: Financial and Health Dimensions Across the Life Course" describing how people can thrive by matching their Health Spans, Wealth Spans, and Life Spans as they enjoy increasingly long lives. Transitions commonly associated with advancing age—work disruptions, physical decline, dementia—can be better managed when a person has planned for the social support, financial means, and health resources needed to compensate for aging-related physical and cognitive changes. As people age, chronic diseases accumulate and reduce the ability to carry out the necessary activities of daily life. When a person also is lacking in social support, financial resources, or access to health care, the result of declining functional ability is a downward and potentially irreversible spiral. Insecurities in life—including uncertainty about food, housing, transportation, health care, or safety—exacerbate this situation, leading people to live in isolation or poverty and to be unable to seek the interventions they need for maintaining health and ultimately their ability to take care of themselves. In this webinar, experts in the field will exchange ideas about the concept of Longevity Fitness and insights into positive aging across the life course. For more information on longevity economics and longevity fitness, see www.geron.org/longevity.

Presented by:

  • Peter A. Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, FGSA, Wayne State University, Institute of Gerontology
  • Mary D. Naylor, PhD, RN, FAAN, New Courtland Center for Transitions and Health, University of Pennsylvania

Supported by Bank of America.

Aging Native American, Rural, and Homeless Populations: Engagement and Advocacy During the COVID-19 Pandemic

July 22, 2020

The COVID-19 public health crisis is perilously affecting all sectors of life, including services for older adults. Most gravely affected by this crisis have been some of the most vulnerable among us—marginalized older adult populations. The impact of COVID-19 and the effectiveness of various responses among these disparate populations are seldom considered in a common frame and in relation to each other. This webinar brings together community and public health leaders and advocates in a facilitated problem-identification and problem-solving discourse about aging Native American, rural, and homeless populations with regard to the challenges and effectiveness of responses to COVID-19.

Presented by:

  • Carla Frase, Director, Blue Rivers Area Agency / ADRC
  • David Knego, MSW, Executive Director, Curry Senior Center
  • Donna L. Polk, PhD, MS, LMHP, Chief Executive Officer, Nebraska Urban Indian Health Collation

This webinar is organized by the GSA Environmental Gerontology and Rural Aging Interest Groups.

Hearing- and Vision-Related Practical Strategies for Clinical Research With Older Adults During COVID-19 Pandemic

June 24, 2020

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have had to quickly adapt protocols in order to collect data remotely or while practicing social distancing from participants of ongoing clinical studies. This is especially true for researchers with an older adult study population, for whom the virus poses high risk. Older adult study participants are more likely to have hearing or vision impairment, or a combination. The webinar panelists will offer practical strategies and supporting case studies to help health-system researchers address older adults’ sensory health needs, while advancing their research aims during the time of the pandemic.

Presented by:

  • Heather E. Whitson, MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics) and Ophthalmology, Duke University School of Medicine (Moderator)
  • Nicholas S. Reed, AuD, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Bonnielin Swenor, MPH, PhD, Associate Professor, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD, Professor of Otolaryngology and Epidemiology; Director, Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Alan Stevens, PhD, Director, Baylor Scott & White Center for Applied Health Research

Social Media for Research Dissemination: Expanding the Impact of Your Research

May 12, 2020

Description: Social media can play a valuable role in both career development and research dissemination. This webinar is designed to provide attendees with an overview of social media platforms and strategies to effectively use social media to promote research and personal branding. Attendees will also come away with a deeper understanding of the neural underpinnings of social media strategies.

Program Objectives:

  1. To describe the rationale for incorporating social media for research dissemination and personal branding.
  2. To provide an overview of frequently used social media platforms.
  3. To provide an overview of social media use strategies and options.

Presented by:

Julie Marie Faieta, PhD, OTR/L, is a rehabilitation science researcher at The Ohio State University, a postdoctoral fellow at Université Laval in Quebec, and a clinical occupational therapist. Her primary area of research is the development and evaluation of assistive and pervasive technology-based interventions to address health span and quality of life in individuals with neurodegenerative conditions and caregiver populations. With a specific interest in Alzheimer’s disease and technology-mediated sleep supports, Dr. Faieta is investigating interventions that can be effectively implemented with persons at risk of disease development and across each stage of the disease progression. During her doctoral studies at The Ohio State University, she completed a minor in neuroscience to facilitate enhanced understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms and disease pathologies associated with neurodegenerative conditions. Dr. Faieta’s other activities include involvement in the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine’s Neurodegenerative Diseases Networking Group as chair of the Alzheimer’s Disease Task Force and as social media officer.

Leveraging Small Grants to Build Your Research Program
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

May 1, 2020

What are small grants and why are they important? Where do you find them? How can you use these grants strategically to further your research? If you are interested in learning how to leverage small grants to build your research program, please join us. Our skilled panel of professionals will present on how to find, apply, and leverage foundation and other pilot funding mechanisms to form collaborations, build a research program, and establish a productive career trajectory with a track record in funding. We will discuss the steps involved in this process, and our two skilled professionals will share their experiences and practical advice about how to make the most of small grants.

Presented by:

  • Jamie Justice, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, at Wake Forest School of Medicine, and she is the current Chair of the GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization (ESPO). Dr. Justice is dedicated to geroscience research, an emerging discipline that advances the hypothesis that by targeting the basic biology of aging, the incidence of multiple age-related diseases and functional declines can be delayed or prevented collectively. She works to translate promising geroscience-guided interventions to clinical trials in older adults. This work includes a clinical trial designed to facilitate U.S. regulatory approval for aging and age-related diseases as a drug target and clinical investigations on the biological aging process of cellular senescence. Dr. Justice’s work has been funded primarily through competitive internal pilot awards and funding through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute on Aging, Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Glenn Foundation, and American Federation of Aging Research. Dr. Justice is an engaged member of the interdisciplinary NIH-supported Translational Geroscience Network.
  • Amy Hoffman, PhD, RN, is a Professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Assistant Dean for the College of Nursing at the Omaha Campus. In 2018, Dr. Hoffman was awarded a 5-year, multistate, 3-arm randomized clinical trial from the NIH National Cancer Institute. Her program of research is focused on changing the face of postsurgical lung cancer rehabilitation via virtual reality–based exercise to improve symptom and functional status and quality of life. She consults with other disciplines to leverage her knowledge to design interventions for other oncology populations with multiple comorbid conditions to enhance symptom management and quality of life. The results of her research have been published in multiple high-impact journals and scientists are utilizing her methods and findings in other populations. She also designed and tested the Theory of Symptom Self-Management for application by clinical practitioners and researchers to empower patients to optimize self-management of symptoms using self-directed action. Dr. Hoffman’s research was awarded the Distinguished Scientist Award by the University of Nebraska Medical Center in March 2020. She will serve on the scientific review panel at the NIH (June 2020) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (April 2020).

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Why Reframe? Understanding the Significance and Tools of Reframing Aging and Reframing Elder Abuse

April 30, 2020

The Reframing Aging Initiative is a long-term social endeavor designed to improve the public’s understanding of what aging means and the many ways that older people contribute to society. Its sister project, Reframing Elder Abuse, aims to demonstrate how we can put elder abuse on the public agenda, generate a sense of collective responsibility, and boost support for systemic solutions to address elder abuse. This webinar will build understanding of both projects, discuss where they overlap, and build awareness about the impact of ageism on society.

Presented by:

  • Patricia M. D’Antonio, BSPharm, MS, MBA, BCGP, is the Vice President of Professional Affairs for The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and a board-certified geriatric pharmacist. Trish is responsible for developing and managing GSA’s relationships with other organizations in the aging arena and leading major Society programs and projects. D’Antonio directs GSA’s policy initiatives through the National Academy on an Aging Society, GSA’s non-partisan public policy institute. Additionally, she serves as the Project Director for the Reframing Aging Initiative and is a trained Reframing Aging Facilitator. D'Antonio received her Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, and received her Master of Science in Health Finance and Master in Business Administration with a concentration in health care from Temple University in Philadelphia. She completed a residency in administration and finance at The Philadelphia Geriatric Center.
  • Laurie Gibson Lindberg is the Project Manager of the Reframing Aging Initiative at The Gerontological Society of America (GSA). She has been a trained Reframing Aging Facilitator for two years. Laurie’s background is in health and aging policy and programs with an emphasis on advocacy. She has held legislative roles on Capitol Hill as committee and personal staff, directed educational programs at the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement, and most recently, at GSA, she coordinated the Dementia Caregiving Network and the National Research Summit on Dementia Care and Services held at NIH. Lindberg graduated from Cornell University with a degree in history and attended graduate school for health policy at The George Washington University.
  • Aly Neumann received her Bachelors in Arts in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. She has over 5 years of experience supporting public service organizations in communications, event coordination and internal operations. She has served as Project Coordinator for the NCEA’s Reframing Elder Abuse project for 3 years. She has conducted dozens of interactive professional presentations and technical assistance on applying evidence-based public communications practices on elder abuse.

Reframing the Response to COVID-19: Applying Reframed Language to Counteract Ageism

April 21, 2020

Many of us are concerned by the ageism exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this webinar, the presenters offer ways that we can respond using empirically-supported narratives developed by the FrameWorks Institute for the Reframing Aging Initiative and other projects to frame the public discourse on social and scientific issues. Review the webinar and slides to learn strategies for connecting COVID-19 and aging without perpetuating ageist tropes.

Presented by:

The Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol: A New HRS Data Resource

March 25, 2020

The Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP) is part of an international research collaboration funded by the National Institute on Aging to measure and understand dementia risk within ongoing longitudinal studies of aging around the world with the aim to harmonize methods and content to facilitate cross-national comparisons. The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) HCAP was designed to serve as a central hub for harmonization. The HRS HCAP sample includes 3,496 respondents who have completed a carefully selected set of established cognitive and neuropsychological assessments to better characterize cognitive function in older adults. This webinar will provide an overview of the design and content of the HCAP study followed by a question and answer portion.

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her doctorate through the Department of Health, Behavior, and Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. Dr. Sonnega has lectured in the UM School of Public Health on psychosocial factors in health-related behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.
  • Lindsay Ryan, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. She received her doctoral degree in Human Development and Family Studies in 2008 from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Ryan is an investigator on several ongoing research projects, all of which involve an interest in better measuring and understanding the processes by which adults change over the life course. Her research interests include investigating individual and contextual influences on well-being, physical health, and cognition across adulthood, with a particular focus on the impact of social relations. She has worked on the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) for 10 years, and is involved in the development and management of the cognition and psychosocial content within the HRS.

This webinar, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America, has been developed and is presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging. Visit GSA's YouTube channel for previous installments: Introduction to the Health and Retirement Study; Biomarkers Data; Data on Cognition; HRS Sample Design, Weighting, and Complex Variance Estimation; Psychosocial Data Resources in the HRS.

Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series)

February 10, 2020

This webinar presents a description of two large cohorts that use data from the U.S. Veterans Administration (VA). The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) comprises all HIV-infected (55,000) veterans in VA care from 1997 to 2017, each matched to two demographically similar uninfected veterans. The Veteran Birth Cohort includes all veterans born between 1945 and 1965 who have used VA care from 1997 to 2017 (4.5 million), encompassing person-time between ages 35 and 75 years. Both cohorts have complete electronic health record data, including diagnoses, procedures, lab results, medication fill dates, vital signs, and self-reported tobacco and alcohol use. This information is augmented with supplemental data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as well as the National Death Index. Several exposures and outcomes have been validated with chart review.

Presented by:

  • Janet Tate, MPH, ScD, Affiliated Principal Investigator, VACS; Member of the Executive Committee; Director, Biostatistics Core; Co-Director, Risk Index Workgroup; Co-Director, Liver Core

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Other entries:

The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS)/Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) Combined Cohort Study (MWCCS)
(HIV and Aging: Data Access, Availability, and Research Funding Opportunities Webinar Series) 

January 30, 2020

This webinar presents a description of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS)/Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) Combined Cohort Study (MWCCS), including an overview of the two cohorts that comprise the MWCCS, the more than 25-year longitudinal case-control design (HIV+ and HIV-) and every-6-month legacy measures of sociodemographic, aging (e.g., frailty, falls, cognition), cardiovascular health, mental health (depressive symptoms), sexual health, and behavior data as well as genome-wide association studies and biospecimen resources.

Presented by:

  • Deborah Gustafson, PhD, Co-Principal Investigator, Brooklyn Clinical Research Site of the MWCCS

Continued research on HIV prevention and intervention among older adults is crucial as people aged 50 years and older accounted for 17% of new infections in 2016, approximately 50% of all people living with HIV in the United States are in this age group, and people are living longer with HIV owing to improvements in antiretroviral therapy in the past several years. Therefore, this webinar series covers access to multiple data sources and their availability, which can be used to answer important research questions in HIV and aging. In addition, this webinar series reports on funding opportunities for HIV and aging research, which will help to provide support in advancing research in this area.

This webinar series, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), has been organized by the GSA HIV, AIDS, and Older Adults Interest Group and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Inter-CFAR HIV and Aging Working Group.

Other entries:


The Art of Engaging Older Adults in Research

December 11, 2019

This webinar highlights two diverse research advisory boards that are working to bring the experiential voice of older adults to research. Researchers working with these advisory boards will discuss their unique models of engagement, use of technology, and experiences in recruitment, training, and sustainability of research advisory boards. The experiential voice of older adults is largely absent from health research, often leading to the development of ineffective programs and policies. While older adults have the capacity to participate in the design, development, and delivery of research, researchers traditionally do not recognize such capacity, may be unsure how to seek their input, or may not fully appreciate the extent to which such input can improve the research enterprise. Yet, the participation of these stakeholders, can ensure that patient-centered research meaningfully addresses older adults’ care preferences and desired health outcomes, and can ultimately improve the effectiveness of programs and policies as well as quality of care and quality of life for vulnerable older adults. 

Moderator:  

  • Amy Eisenstein, PhD, Program Officer, The Retirement Research Foundation

Panelists:  

  • Carol Geary, PhD, MBA, RN, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Medicine
  • Erin McGaffigan, PhD, Policy and Research Fellow, LeadingAge LTSS Center, University of Massachusetts Boston

Discussant:  

  • Gyasi Moscou-Jackson, PhD, MHS, RN, Nurse Scientist, University of Maryland Medical Center

Advancing International Research in Residential Long-Term Care With Common Data Elements

October 25, 2019

International research on long-term care (LTC) can valuably inform LTC policy and practice, but limited transnational collection of data on key LTC issues restricts the contributions of international LTC research. Effectively addressing key challenges to providing high-quality, person-centered, residential LTC requires data sharing and aggregation, but this can only be achieved through the development and implementation of common data elements (CDEs) in an open, collaborative infrastructure. This webinar reviews Worldwide Elements To Harmonize Research In long-term care liVing Environments (WE-THRIVE), an initiative led by LTC researchers—including researchers from low-, middle-, and high-income countries—to identify LTC CDEs that can be implemented internationally for the purpose of supporting older adult thriving. We discuss four key measurement domains of organizational context, workforce and staffing, person-centered care, and care outcomes, as well as explore opportunities for participants to engage in consortium efforts. 

Presented by:

  • Adam Gordon, PhD, MB, ChB, MMedSci(Clin Ed), FRCP, FRCPEdin, Professor of the Care of Older People, University of Nottingham; Visiting Professor, City University London; Consultant Geriatrician, Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Michael Lepore, PhD, Senior Health Policy and Health Services Researcher, RTI International; Adjunct Assistant Professor of Health Services, Policy, and Practice, Brown University
  • Kristen Corazzini, PhD, Associate Dean for the PhD Program, Office of the Academic Deans; Professor, Organizational Systems and Adult Health—University of Maryland, School of Nursing.

Tips on How to Successfully Negotiate Your Job Offer
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

September 6, 2019

What happens after you receive a job offer? How do you negotiate and prepare for your position? If you are looking for tips and advice about successful job negotiation and how to best spend your time before starting your new job, then this webinar is for you. You’ll learn useful strategies from our skilled panel: Keith A. Anderson, PhD, MSW, FGSA, will discuss negotiations in academia and Hannah Wohlfert, MBA, will discuss her job negotiation experiences in industry. These knowledgeable professionals will share their insights and practical advice on how to maximize a job negotiation for a successful future.

Presented by:

  • Keith A. Anderson, PhD, MSW, FGSA, is a Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Montana, Director of the Montana Geriatric Education Center, and Series Editor for Columbia University Press. During his career, he has been a Hartford Doctoral Fellow, Hartford Faculty Scholar, and Associate Professor in the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University. Dr. Anderson’s scholarship focuses on the health and well-being of older adults and their caregivers, home and community-based services, and the creation and evaluation of applied interventions.
  • Hannah Wohlfert, MBA, has worked in the technology industry for over 14 years across multiple areas, including quality assurance, business analysis, and now in enterprise project management. During these years, she has changed full-time jobs nine times and negotiated for each of those roles. Ms. Wohlfert has an undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Notre Dame and a master of business administration degree from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business. In addition to her day job, she is involved in career consulting and runs a successful tech consultancy, helping companies and individuals with data and visualization needs.

This webinar was supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Sun Protection and Sunburn Among Older U.S. Adults

August 2, 2019

The second of a two-part series on cancer prevention during older adulthood, this webinar will describe the prevalence of sunburn and use of sun protection among U.S. adults aged 65 years and older. The webinar will also address associations between sun protection behaviors and sunburn and the public health implications for skin cancer prevention among older adults.

The content of this webinar will be founded on the paper titled “Association Between Sun Protection Behaviors and Sunburn Among U.S. Older Adults,” which was authored by the speaker, Dawn M. Holman, MPH, and coworkers Helen Ding, MD, MSPH; MaryBeth Freeman, MPH, and Meredith L. Shoemaker, MPH. The paper will be published in a CDC-funded supplemental issue of The Gerontologist on Opportunities for Cancer Prevention During Older Adulthood. Preliminary analyses of the research were presented as a poster presentation at the 4th International Conference on UV and Skin Cancer Prevention in Toronto, Canada in May 2018.

The webinar topic may be of interest to researchers, public health professionals, and health care providers who are interested in health promotion among older adults. It may also appeal to those with an interest specifically in skin cancer prevention.

Presented by:

  • Dawn M. Holman, MPH, is a behavioral scientist in the Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch of the CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. Her work is focused on opportunities to reduce cancer risk through community-level strategies that make it easier for people to adopt healthy behaviors and reduce harmful exposures at every stage of life. She leads the Division’s skin cancer prevention efforts, including use of national data to examine sun-protective behaviors, indoor tanning, and sunburn among U.S. adolescents and adults and trends over time in the incidence of skin cancer. Ms. Holman leads the development of CDC’s annual Skin Cancer Prevention Progress Report and other skin cancer prevention resources and she served as a lead writer for the U.S. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer.

Health Literacy Considerations for Cancer Prevention Initiatives With Older Adults

June 28, 2019

The first of a two-part series on cancer prevention during older adulthood, this webinar focuses on new developments in health literacy studies and implications for public health and health care programs and practices. Of particular interest are strategies for increasing the accessibility of health information and support for healthful action. This webinar builds on the U.S. National Prevention Strategy to provide an argument for attention to literacy and numeracy with illustrations related to the development of efficacious health communication strategies geared toward older adults.

For background, read the paper titled “Health Literacy Considerations for a New Cancer Prevention Initiative” authored by the speaker, Rima E. Rudd, ScD, and published in a CDC-funded supplemental issue of The Gerontologist on Opportunities for Cancer Prevention During Older Adulthood.

The webinar topic may be of interest to researchers, public health professionals, and health care providers who are interested in health promotion among older adults.

Presented by:

  • Rima E. Rudd, ScD, has been a member of the faculty in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences within the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health for 30 years. A founder of and leader in health literacy studies, Dr. Rudd drafted the first national call to action, served on the original Institute of Medicine Health Literacy Committee, and has written and contributed to multiple health policy reports, white papers, and research studies. She is helping to broaden the notion of health literacy with attention to the quality of health-related texts, the communication skills of health and health care professionals, and the barriers and facilitating factors in health environments.

Forming Science-Industry Research Collaborations: A Preview (and Helpful Tips!)

June 26, 2019

The Standford Center on Longevity and Duke Center for Interdisciplinary Decision Science are jointly inviting applications from early career social scientists to attend a workshop at the GSA 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. This full-day workshop will focus on strategies and tools for academic researchers to collaborate with private-sector companies on applied research problems and interventions related to everday decision making and behavior.

Topics will include:

  • Strategies for engaging private-sector collaborations.
  • Indentifying mutually interesting research questions.
  • Tips for communicating with the private sector.
  • Navigating the research process: funding, timelines, contracts, scientific rigor, and research ethics.
  • Managing expectations
  • Avoiding conflicts of interest.

There is no cost to participate in this workshop supported by a grant from the National Institute on Aging. Two nights lodging and airfare will be covered by accepted applicants. 

Eligibility: Assistant professors, postdocs, and PhD students who have advanced to candidacy. Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Presented by:

  • Dr. Greg Samanez-Larkin, Duke University
  • Dr. Marti DeLiema, Standford Center on Longevity

Psychosocial Data Resources in the HRS

April 30, 2019

This webinar will provide an overview of the psychosocial data resources in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It will also provide practical guidance on using the data, including how to: merge two half-sample waves, apply the appropriate weights, and construct analytic files to conduct dyadic analyses. A question and answer portion of the webinar will allow users to pose specific questions related to survey content and to their analyses. Joining Amanda Sonnega in the question and answer session will be Jacqui Smith, the HRS co-investigator who leads the development of HRS psychosocial content, and Lindsay Ryan, who is a key member of the HRS psychosocial group.

Visit GSA's YouTube channel for previous installments: Introduction to HRS; Biomarkers Data; Data on Cognition; and HRS Sample Design, Weighting, and Complex Variance Estimation

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, PhD, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her doctorate through the Department of Health, Behavior, and Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. Dr. Sonnega has lectured in the UM School of Public Health on psychosocial factors in health-related behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.
  • Jacqui Smith, PhD, Professor of Psychology and Research Professor, Institute for Social Research, and co-investigator of the HRS. Her research deals with the heterogeneity of psychological functioning, well-being, and health in midlife and old age. She uses experimental and survey methodologies to investigate age-cohort differences and age-related change in cognitive functioning, self-regulation, and well-being. Her current research focuses on subjective well-being after age 50, psychological vitality in the oldest-old, early-life and life course predictors of outcomes in later life, self-perceptions of aging, and cognitive aging.
  • Lindsay Ryan, PhD, is an Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. She received her doctoral degree in Human Development and Family Studies in 2008 from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Ryan is an investigator on several ongoing research projects, all of which involve an interest in better measuring and understanding the processes by which adults change over the life course. Her research interests include investigating individual and contextual influences on well-being, physical health, and cognition across adulthood, with a particular focus on the impact of social relations. She has worked on the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) for 10 years, and is involved in the development and management of the cognition and psychosocial content within the HRS.

This webinar, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America, has been developed and is presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging.

Discussion on The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit for the Older Adult: Challenges and Opportunities

April 10, 2019

Presented by:

  • Patricia D’Antonio, BSPharm, MS, MBA, BCGP, GSA Vice President, Professional Affairs
  • Barbara Resnick, PhD, RN, CRNP, Professor, OSAH, Sonya Ziporkin Gershowitz Chair in Gerontology, University of Maryland School of Nursing
  • Sherri Sheinfeld Gorin, PhD, FSBM, Department of Family Medicine, The School of Medicine, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, New York Physicians against Cancer, New York, NY
  • Peter A. Hollmann, MD, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Brian Kaskie, PhD, Public Policy & Aging Report Editor-in-Chief, University of Iowa

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Finding and Getting the Most Out of Your Postdoctoral Fellowship Experience
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

April 5, 2019

Where do you find opportunities about postdoctoral fellowships in your field? How do you get the most out of your postdoctoral fellowship experience? If you are considering a postdoctoral position after obtaining your PhD, and wish to learn more about how to find a postdoctoral fellowship and get the most out of your experience, please join us. Our skilled panel of professionals includes a former postdoc (Ryon J. Cobb, PhD) and a current postdoc (Jasmine Travers, PhD, AGPCNP-BC, RN) along with a postdoctoral mentor (Julene K. Johnson, PhD). Our three skilled professionals discuss the process of finding and applying for postdoctoral opportunities and share their experiences and practical advice on how to maximize your experience as a postdoctoral fellow.

Presented by:

  • Ryon J. Cobb, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Texas at Arlington. His program of research elucidates how experiences of mistreatment combine with one’s racial/ethnic identification to affect the health of adults in the United States. His research has appeared or is forthcoming in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, Social Psychology Quarterly, Ethnicity and Health, Race and Social Problems, and Biodemography and Social Biology. Several institutes within and outside the National Institutes of Health have invested in his work, including the Louisville Institute; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; and the National Institute on Aging. He received a doctorate in sociology with a focus on health and aging from the Florida State University and he received postdoctoral training in the biodemography of aging at the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California.
  • Julene K. Johnson, PhD, is the Associate Dean of Research for the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing and the Associate Director at the UCSF Institute for Health and Aging. She is also the Research Education Core Lead and mentor in the UCSF Center for Aging in Diverse Communities. Dr. Johnson is a cognitive neuroscientist; she obtained her doctorate at the University of Texas at Dallas and completed postdoctoral training at the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Johnson’s research program focuses on cognitive aging and covers two primary themes: (1) developing cost-effective and novel community-based interventions (e.g., arts interventions) to promote health and well-being, particularly for diverse older adults; and (2) studying risks and protective factors for cognitive and functional decline in older adults. Her research on community-engaged health promotion involves racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse older adults.
  • Jasmine Travers, PhD, AGPCNP-BC, RN, is a postdoctoral fellow in the National Clinician Scholars Program at Yale University Schools of Medicine and Nursing. She is receiving training in a cohort of physicians and doctorally prepared nurses to become a health systems leader driving policy-relevant research and partnerships to improve health and health care. Previously, Dr. Travers completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health and a Vice Provost Fellowship for Academic Diversity. Her current work focuses on mitigating disparities in access and use of in-home and facility-based care for older adults and how best to optimize health outcomes among older adults across long-term care settings. Dr. Travers is the author of over 20 manuscripts on aging, long-term care, health disparities, workforce diversity, and infections; she has presented her work at multiple regional and national health services research, gerontological, nursing, and public health conferences.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Momentum Discussion: Leveraging Improved Vaccine Technology and the Health Care Team to Protect Older Adults

April 1, 2019

Continuing the conversation from the Momentum Discussion at the GSA 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting, this webinar will explore the exciting developments in vaccine technology, review the underappreciated benefits of vaccination, and share evidence-based strategies that health care teams can use to help raise immunization rates, thereby preventing disease and its complications in older adults.

Presented by:

  • "Overview of Adult Immunization Rates and Challenges to Improvement": Kevin O'Neil, MD, FACP, CMD, has been a recognized leader in the senior living and geriatric medicine fields for more than 30 years. He is currently the Chief Medical Officer for Affinity Living Group and a clinical professor in the Department of Aging Studies at the University of South Florida. Dr. O’Neil was formerly the Chief Medical Officer for Brookdale Senior Living from 2005 to 2016 and Chief Medical Officer for Ascension Senior Living from 2016 to 2018. He also served as the medical advisor for The Institute for Optimal Aging.Dr. O’Neil is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in both internal medicine and geriatric medicine. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the American Geriatrics Society. He is a Certified Medical Director of AMDA—The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine and recently served on its Board of Directors. Dr. O’Neil also serves on the Board of Directors of the Senior Friendship Centers of Southwest Florida and on the Board of First Step in Sarasota, Florida, which provides addiction recovery programs. Dr. O'Neil is on the editorial board of the peer-reviewed journal The Medical Roundtable: General Medicine Editionand he is co-editor and a contributing writer for Optimal Aging Manual.
  • "Improving Vaccine Effectiveness in Older Adults: Advances in Vaccine Technology": Janet McElhaney, MD, FRCPC, FACP, is a geriatrician and the Health Sciences North Volunteer Association Chair in Healthy Aging and the Vice President of Research and Scientific Director of the Health Sciences North Research Institute in Sudbury, Ontario. She is also a professor of medicine at Northern Ontario School of Medicine and an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.Dr. McElhaney’s research interests include the effect of immunosenescence and inflammaging on the immune responses to vaccination, immunologic biomarkers of protection mediated by vaccination, and how vaccination plays a role in preventing disability in older adults. More recently, she has fostered several positive relationships with indigenous communities and health care leaders to help address multimorbidity and support collaborative community and team-based approaches to healthy aging of older indigenous people in Northern Ontario. She serves on editorial boards for the Journal of Immunology and Journal of Infectious Diseases, as an advisor to the European Scientific Working Group on Influenza, and on multiple grant review panels and advisory boards in Canada, the United States, Europe, and Asia.
  • "Beyond Disease Prevention: The Building Benefits of Vaccination": Stefan Gravenstein, MD, MPH, is an academic and clinical geriatrician, currently serving as professor in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Care, Department of Medicine at Brown University. He is also active with the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Gravenstein was a member of the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s influenza guidelines committee and co-author of the Annenberg Center for Health Sciences publication Optimizing the Prevention of Herpes Zoster in Older Adults.Dr. Gravenstein routinely speaks at Medical Grand Rounds and other lectures about influenza vaccine. He understands practical implications of vaccine recommendations and has been working with quality improvement projects to change the behavior of individuals in institutions specific to vaccines.
  • "Putting it Into Practice: One Health System’s Success at Improving Adult Immunization Rates": April Green, PharmD, is the Population Health Management Ambulatory Care Clinical Pharmacist and co-chair of the System Vaccine Subcommittee for Ochsner Health System in New Orleans. Prior to becoming a pharmacist, she earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Xavier University of Louisiana–New Orleans and worked as a semiconductor engineer for Toppan Photomasks, where her projects ranged from manufacturing of phase shift masks to product integration engineering. She received her doctor of pharmacy degree and completed Pharmacy Postgraduate Year One residency training with Xavier and the interim Louisiana State University Hospital. Dr. Green joined Ochsner in 2014 as an inpatient staff pharmacist at the Slidell hospital campus and later relocated to the Ochsner Main Campus in New Orleans for her current role. As Population Health Management Pharmacist, she is responsible for assisting with efforts to improve Ochsner’s quality measure outcomes, increasing vaccination rates in the pediatric and adult populations, increasing comprehensive medication reviews performed by pharmacists, and improving patients’ medication adherence for the treatment of chronic health conditions.

This webinar is developed by The Gerontological Society of America and supported by Seqirus. The content is based on a program hosted at the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting, sponsored by Merck, Pfizer, Sanofi Pasteur, and Seqirus.

HRS Sample Design, Weighting, and Complex Variance Estimation

March 26, 2019

This webinar provides an overview of the complex sample design of the Health and Retirement Study. It also provides practical guidance on the application of sample weights and complex variance estimation in analysis of the data. A question and answer portion of the webinar will allow users to pose specific questions related to their analyses.

Videos on the Introduction to HRS; Biomarkers Data; and Data on Cognition are available on GSA’s YouTube Channel.

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, PhD, is an Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her doctorate through the Department of Health, Behavior, and Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. Dr. Sonnega has lectured in the UM School of Public Health on psychosocial factors in health-related behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.
  • Sunghee Lee, PhD, is an Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Methodology Program at the University of Michigan. She earned her doctorate from the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Previously, Dr. Lee served as Survey Methodologist for the California Health Interview Survey and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include sampling and measurement issues in data collection with linguistic and racial minorities as well as hard-to-reach populations and cross-cultural survey methodology.
  • Ryan McCammon, MS, is Research Area Specialist Lead, having joined the Health and Retirement Study program in November 2018. He was previously with the University of Michigan (UM) Department of Internal Medicine as a Database Analyst while working on his master’s degree in survey methodology, which he completed in April 2018. He also holds a master’s degree in sociology from UM and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Wabash College.

This webinar, which is hosted by The Gerontological Society of America, has been developed and is presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging.

A Starting Point for Looking at Age-Friendliness on My Campus: AGHE Can Help
(Part 3 of 3)

March 1, 2019

This webinar will discuss data-gathering approaches to explore your institution’s age-friendly assets, gaps, and opportunities along with how AGHE can be an Age-Friendly University resource for you and your institution.

Presented by:

  • Nina M. Silverstein, PhD (University of Massachusetts Boston—Massachusetts, USA)
  • Marilyn Gugliucci, PhD (University of New England—Maine, USA)

Made possible through a grant from the Retirement Research Foundation to AGHE for the Founders 3.0 Project.

One Vision, Many Paths: Making an Age-Friendly University Work for You
(Part 2 of 3)

February 6, 2019

This webinar examines how different institutions approach their AFU vision and offer examples of how your institution can draw on its distinctive strengths to realize the AFU principles.

Presented by:

  • Carrie Andreoletti, PhD (Central Connecticut State University—Connecticut, USA)
  • Andrea June, PhD (Central Connecticut State University—Connecticut, USA)

Made possible through a grant from the Retirement Research Foundation to AGHE for the Founders 3.0 Project.

The Road to Austin: Mapping the Steps for GSA 2019 Abstract Submission

January 31, 2019

Prepare yourself in advance of the March 14 deadline to submit your abstract for the GSA 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. This webinar will enhance your knowledge and skills for submitting an abstract. Hear from the experts about the importance and process of submitting an abstract and how best to prepare an abstract for submission.

Presented by:

  • GSA President and Program Chair S. Michal Jazwinski, PhD, FGSA, of Tulane University, and Program Co-Chair Holly Brown-Borg, PhD, FGSA, of the University of North Dakota, will walk attendees through the ins and outs of the GSA 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting call for abstracts.
  • John Beilenson, President of Strategic Communications & Planning, who has been advising scientists about communications for more than a decade, will demonstrate how to make your submission stand out from the crowd. Facilitate your abstract preparation and submission experience—and avoid disqualifying errors and rushing at the last minute—by becoming familiar with the constructive information presented in this webinar.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Becoming an Age-Friendly University Partner
(Part 1 of 3)

January 9, 2019

This webinar will describe why higher education needs to be more age-friendly, the vision of the AFU initiative, and how your institution can join the AFU network.

Presented by:

  • Joann M. Montepare, PhD (Lasell College—Massachusetts, USA)
  • Kimberly S. Farah, PhD (Lasell College—Massachusetts, USA)

Made possible through a grant from the Retirement Research Foundation to AGHE for the Founders 3.0 Project.


Translating Basic Research on the Aging Family to Caregiving Intervention

October 31, 2018

Gerontology has sought to establish optimal connections between the scientific activities of researchers and the real-world concerns of practitioners and clinicians. The concept of translational research has emerged in recent years as a model for bridging the gap between science and service. This webinar provides examples of the translational research process, demonstrating how a body of basic research can be mined for insights that can guide intervention. A focus on within-family differences in older parent–adult child relationships suggests how existing caregiving interventions could be adapted or fine-tuned to take advantage of empirical insights regarding family complexity. Background reading: Translating Basic Research on the Aging Family to Caregiving Intervention: The Case of Within-Family Differences

Presented by:

  • Megan Gilligan, PhD, Assistant Professor, Human Development and Family Studies, Iowa State University
  • Laura P. Sands, PhD, FGSA, Editor-in-Chief, Innovation in Aging; Professor, Human Development and Family Science, Virginia Tech
  • Steven M. Albert, PhD, FGSA, Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Innovation in Aging; Professor and Chair, Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund

Academic Job Market: What Every Early Professional Needs to Know
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 26, 2018

How should you prepare yourself to become a competitive candidate for an academic career? If your career goal is to become a faculty member, this webinar will provide guidance. The presenters share the basics of a job market process and how to present your research and teaching experiences. The process of entering the academic job market may seem overwhelming, but three skilled professionals share practical advice as well as their own experience on how to navigate academic job market.

Presented by:

  • Barbara Cochrane, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA is the de Tornyay Endowed Professor for Healthy Aging and Interim Chair of the Department of Family and Child Nursing at the University of Washington School of Nursing. Her research and professional commitments focus primarily on older women’s health and healthy aging, specifically positive aspects of aging, symptoms in older women, breast cancer prevention and survivorship, and cardiovascular health. She has presented and consulted nationally and internationally on midlife and older women’s health, health promotion, and community care transitions for older persons.
  • Noelle Fields, PhD, MSW, LCSW is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Texas at Arlington. She is a gerontology health researcher specializing in family caregiving among vulnerable populations and home- and community-based services for older adults. She has expertise in conducting community-based participatory research and has co-authored a book, Home and Community-Based Services for Older Adults: Aging in Context, with Columbia University Press. Dr. Fields has been the PI and Co-PI on several funded projects including a qualitative community assessment of “aging well” in Arlington, Texas. Currently, she is the PI of a funded project from the Transportation Center for Livable Communities to design an innovative electronic daily transportation diary for older adults using app technology.
  • Cal Halvorsen, PhD, MSW is an Assistant Professor at the Boston College School of Social Work and an expert on productive engagement in later life, with particular emphasis on longer working lives. He investigates self-employment and entrepreneurship in later life, encore careers, and the role institutions of higher education can play in helping those past midlife to re-career. He has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses in social work and aging. Before earning his PhD, Cal was the director of research at Encore.org, a national nonprofit that aims to engage people at midlife and beyond to improve their communities and the world.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Moving From Linear to Reciprocal: Conceptualizing Productive Engagement Using System Dynamics

October 24, 2018

In this webinar, the authors of Conceptualizing Productive Engagement in a System Dynamics Framework describe the background that led to system dynamics scholars and gerontologists coming together to think differently about the topic of productive engagement in later life. The authors proposed that existing conceptual frameworks that articulate the antecedents and outcomes of productive engagement in a linear fashion can be improved using system dynamics. System dynamics assumes that feedback mechanisms or circular causality are central to social reality and is distinct from more traditional statistical techniques that infer unidirectional cause and effect. This approach offers a more complete understanding of the feedback loops between individuals, families, and society, as well as the impact of potential program and policy changes intended to increase the productive engagement of older adults. To create a system dynamics model, seven experts in productive aging and system dynamics met regularly to produce the “stock and flow” diagram presented in Innovation in Aging. The findings from this unique, qualitative effort suggest that there are modifiable conditions to increase the utilization of human capital in productive activities, advancing theory and helping to refine the productive aging research agenda. This activity also served as an educational and professional development tool for both teaching and research. In this session, the authors review the rationale for the project, the methods used to create the system dynamics model, the model itself, and implications of this work.

Presented by:

  • Nancy Morrow-Howell, MSW, PhD, FGSA, Betty Bofinger Brown Distinguished Professor of Social Policy, Brown School of Social Work Center for Aging, Washington University
  • Cal Halvorsen, MSW, PhD, Assistant Professor, Boston College School of Social Work
  • Laura P. Sands, PhD, FGSA, Editor-in-Chief, Innovation in Aging; Professor, Virginia Tech

Approaches to Measuring Wisdom

July 11, 2018

Wisdom research is a fast-growing field, and more and more investigators, especially those studying aging, are interested in using measures of wisdom. A number of measures of wisdom are available that differ in conceptual background and measurement approach. After attending this webinar, participants will be able to select the measure of wisdom that best fits their research questions. A broad distinction is made between self-report measures and performance-based measures, both of which have advantages and disadvantages. In this webinar, we discuss general issues in the measurement of wisdom, give a detailed overview of the existing measures, and describe current and potential future developments. In addition to describing the current state of wisdom measurement, we hope to attract researchers who are interested in developing new, creative measures of this complex construct.

Presented by:

  • Judith Glück, Dr. rer. nat., is a professor of developmental psychology at the University of Klagenfurt in Austria. Her main field of research is wisdom—how wisdom develops, under which conditions it manifests itself, how laypeople define it, and how it can be measured. She studied psychology at the University of Vienna with a focus on measurement and item-response theory and was then introduced to wisdom research by Paul Baltes when she was a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. Thus, she brought her background in psychometrics to the field of wisdom research and has published several papers on how wisdom can be measured. Currently, Dr. Glück is editing a psychological sciences special issue of The Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences on new developments in psychological wisdom research and co-editing the Cambridge Handbook of Wisdom with Robert J. Sternberg.
  • Nic M. Weststrate, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Developmental Psychology at the University of Klagenfurt in Austria. His research examines growth and adjustment in response to challenging life experiences with a particular focus on the association between diverse modes of self-reflective processing and wisdom. Dr. Weststrate is an alumnus of the Wisdom and Identity Lab in the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the University of Toronto and a current member of the university’s Institute for Life Course and Aging.

Health and Retirement Study: Biomarkers Data
(Part 3 of 3)

April 24, 2018

This webinar provides an overview of the data resources on physical measures and biomarkers in the Health and Retirement Study. The first part of the webinar provides information on the design of the physical measures and biomarkers data collection (through dried blood spot) and the measures collected. It also describes the Venous Blood Study with guidance on accessing these sensitive health data and relevant documentation.

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, associate research scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study
  • Jessica Faul, associate research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a co–principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, and affiliated with the Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging, the Population Studies Center, and the University of Michigan BioSocial Methods Collaborative.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

Non-Academic Careers in Aging
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

April 6, 2018

What are career opportunities outside of academia? Do you want to know how to remain involved and be actively involved in gerontology research and policy outside of university institutions? Join our experts in non-academic career paths, as they discuss their experiences in diverse gerontology roles and ways to explore potential trajectories for non-academic careers in aging, offered as part of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series.

Presented by a panel of professionals working in non-academic careers:

  • Mindy Baker, PhD, from George G. Glenner Alzheimer’s Family Centers, Inc. is the Director of Education, where she provides Specialized Alzheimer’s and Dementia Training to their team members and also to professionals in the community. She has more than twenty years of experience working with people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. She has a PhD in Applied Cognitive Aging Psychology and a Certificate of Gerontology from the University of Akron, in Akron, Ohio. Her passion is finding ways to make meaningful connections with people who have dementia and teaching others to do the same.
  • Sonya Barsness, MS, from Sonya Barsness Consulting Sonya is a Masters-prepared Gerontologist with 20 years of experience in aging, primarily in dementia care and long-term care. As a consultant, she works with organizations to support elders, particularly elders with dementia, in living with meaning and purpose, regardless of cognitive or functional challenges, or where they live.
  • Cynthia Dougherty, PhD, MSW, is the Director of the Office of Geriatrics and Interprofessional Aging Studies at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. In her current role, some of her major responsibilities include managing a number of distance education/professional development programs, advising health profession and other students interested in the field of aging, developing and maintaining relationships with community partners, and supporting geriatric and gerontological research.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Methodological Innovations in Gerontology: Advances in Psychosocial Research

April 3, 2018

Over the past decade, the data and methods available to scholars of aging, the life course, and human development have expanded tremendously, enabling explorations of new areas of study and more sophisticated investigations of questions at the core of social gerontology. Scholars working in the social and psychological sciences have moved beyond data resources focused on measurement of individuals at a single or two points in time, and instead investigate the experiences of individuals embedded in dyads, families, social networks, and neighborhoods, at multiple points in time. Technological advances have led to an increased volume of individual-, meta-, and macro-level data, necessitating the development and use of statistical techniques to appropriately model psychosocial phenomena.

This webinar highlights key features of the recently published special issue on methodological innovations in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences.

Presented by:

  • Co-editors Deborah Carr and Shevaun Neupert
  • I-Fen Lin describes applications of the multiple-indicators and multiple-causes (MIMIC) model to intergenerational transfer and reporting bias
  • Nilam Ram presents core concepts from each of his four papers in the issue.

Papers from the special issue discussed on the webinar:

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Health and Retirement Study: Data on Cognition
(Part 2 of 3)

March 27, 2018

This webinar presents an overview of the data resources on cognition in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The first part of the webinar identifies and provides guidance on the measures that have been included in the core survey along with where to find them. It also describes the supplementary clinical study of dementia — the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) — and offers guidance on accessing these sensitive health data. The last part of the formal presentation provides an initial glimpse into a new data resource — the Healthy Cognitive Aging Project (HCAP) — that provided valid data on the presence of cognitive impairment and dementia in the U.S. population.

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her PhD through the Department of Health, Behavior & Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. She has lectured in the UM School of Public Health, teaching Psychosocial Factors in Health-related Behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.

The Road to Boston: Mapping the Steps for GSA 2018 Abstract Submission

January 25, 2018

Be prepared to click submit on March 15 for the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting call for abstracts deadline. This webinar will enhance your knowledge and skills for submitting an abstract. Hear from the experts about the importance and process for submitting an abstract and how best to prepare an abstract for submission.

Presented by:

Introduction to the Health and Retirement Study
(Part 1 of 3)

January 9, 2018

This introduction familiarizes new users with the study including previewing available data, how to access it, and some tips on getting started with analysis. An overview of the study can be found in PubMed: Cohort Profile: the Health and Retirement Study (HRS).

Presented by:

  • Amanda Sonnega, Associate Research Scientist in the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research (ISR) at the University of Michigan (UM), where she is responsible for integrating communication, outreach, and education efforts for the Health and Retirement Study. She received her PhD through the Department of Health, Behavior & Society at the Johns Hopkins University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship within the ISR program in Social Environment and Health. She has lectured in the UM School of Public Health, teaching Psychosocial Factors in Health-related Behavior. Her research focuses on life course trajectories of physical and mental health; institutional and personal factors associated with vulnerability and resilience in aging individuals; and work transitions and their broad effects on health and well-being.

This webinar was developed and presented by the University of Michigan with funds from the National Institute on Aging and hosted by GSA.


NIA Outlook for 2018

December 18, 2017

Join the senior leadership of each program division within the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to learn about the 2018 outlook for aging research.

Moderated by:

  • Marie Bernard, Deputy Director of NIA

Panelists:

  • John Haaga, Director of the Division of Behavioral & Social Research
  • Eliezer Masliah, Director of the Division of Neuroscience
  • Winnie Rossi, Deputy Director of Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology
  • Felipe Sierra, Director of the Division of Aging Biology

How to Use the GSA KAER Toolkit: A 4-step Process to Detecting Cognitive Impairment and Earlier Diagnosis of Dementia

December 13, 2017

With the number of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease continuing to grow (estimated at 6 million Americans in 2017), it is imperative that primary care providers conduct earlier cognitive impairment assessments to ensure that older adults receive appropriate medical care and referrals to community services that can often lead to improved health-related outcomes and well-being.

The online GSA KAER toolkit provides approaches and tools for primary care providers to kickstart the cognition discussion with their patients, to assess for cognitive impairment, to evaluate and diagnose dementia, and to provide post‐diagnostic referrals for education and supportive community services for persons with dementia and their family caregivers.

During this webinar, hear how the KAER model was developed, learn how to use the toolkit, and receive an overview of the approaches and featured tools to implementing each step of the KAER model.

Presented by:

  • Richard H. Fortinsky, PhD, FGSA, Professor, UConn Center on Aging and Department of Medicine, Health Net, Inc., Chair in Geriatrics and Gerontology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
  • Katie Maslow, MSW, Visiting Scholar, The Gerontological Society of America

Supported by an independent grant from Merck & Co., Inc.

US Aging Policy — What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know

November 9, 2017

Think policy doesn’t affect the work that you do in caregiving/immunotherapy/oncology/technology/chronic disease research/long term care/fill-in-the-blank research? Think again. Join GSA Policy Advisor Brian Lindberg, MMHS, and a panel of experts who will discuss how debates that happen on Capitol Hill can impact you. The panel will take your questions live on everything from changes based on the new administration to how to get involved in policy.

Presenters:

  • Ellen Nissenbaum, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
  • Howard Bedlin, National Council on Aging
  • Tricia Neuman, The Kaiser Family Foundation

Trends in Aging

October 26, 2017

Hear GSA leaders discuss top trends in the field of aging. The panelists discuss how issues such as healthcare, lifespan innovations, and long term care cross disciplines

Moderated by:

  • Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FGSA

Presented by:

  • Janko Nikolich-Zugich, MD, PhD, FGSA
  • Tomas Griebling, MD, MPH, FGSA
  • Karl Pillemer, PhD, FGSA
  • Kathy Sykes, MA, FGSA

Educating Policymakers: Sharing Your Expertise with Capitol Hill

October 23, 2017

In this webinar for GSA and NAGE members, experts in the aging field who have testified on Capitol Hill share their perspectives on the process, preparation, and experience of testifying before a congressional committee.

Moderated by:

  • Brian Lindberg, MMHS, GSA Policy Advisor

Presented by:

  • Kathryn Hyer, PhD, MPP, FGSA, Professor/Director Policy Center, School of Aging Studies/Florida Policy Exchange Center on Aging, University of South Florida
  • Janice Knebl, MBA, DO, Chief, Geriatrics Section and Dallas Southwest Osteopathic Physicians, Endowed Chair in Geriatrics, University of North Texas Health Science Center
  • Frank Lin, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Geriatric Medicine, Mental Health, and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Aligning your Scientific Inquiry with Public Policy: Recommendations from Experts in Policy and Aging
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 13, 2017

Given the projected growth of the older population in the United States, researchers and clinicians are tasked to explore ways to promote the health and well-being of older adults through policy. A few examples of relevant policy issues include end-of-life care, elder abuse, long-term care and Medicare reform. Emerging scholars have the unique opportunity to influence policy and engage in important discussions with policy makers to advocate for the aging society. Join us for the eighth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series to learn more about best practices in aligning your work with the public policy arena.

Presented by:

  • Gretchen E. Alkema, PhD, LCSW, FGSA, serves as vice president of policy and communications for The SCAN Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, she was the 2008-09 John Heinz/Health and Aging Policy Fellow and an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow, serving in the office of Senator Blanche L. Lincoln.
  • Brian Lindberg, MSW, MMHS, is the public policy advisor for The Gerontological Society of America in Washington, DC. Brian worked in Congress for ten years on the House Select Committee on Aging and the Senate Special Committee on Aging.
  • Brian Kaskie, PhD, MPH, has served as a professor of health policy in the Department of Health Management and Policy at the University of Iowa, College of Public Health since 2000. He currently is working as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow with the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging (Senator Susan M. Collins).

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Culturally Adapting Interventions to Promote Healthy Aging among Latinos: Best Practices in Research and Publishing
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 17, 2017

The older population in the United States is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. As minority populations grow and see longer life expectancies, researchers and clinicians are tasked to explore ways to promote the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minority populations. Given the growing diversity of the older population emerging scholars are uniquely positioned to focus on the health of minority aging population. In this seventh installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series, learn more about best practices in research and publishing in minority aging. 

Presented by:

  • Adriana Perez, PhD, ANP-BC, FAAN. Perez moved from Arizona to Philadelphia to join the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Nursing faculty in 2015. At Penn, she has the opportunity to strengthen her work so that it has a greater impact and is more sustainable across diverse communities. She is partnering with a pediatric nurse practitioner to develop an inter-generational physical activity program for seniors and their grandchildren. Perez is working with the National Association of Hispanic Nurses to teach multicultural families, particularly Latinos, about concepts such as premiums and co-payments, and the benefits of health insurance, so they can select health insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace and use it to stay healthy and save money.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.


More Than Just Memes: Using Social Media and Technology to Boost Your Career
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 14, 2016

Details: Social media and technology have changed the way many professionals find work, network, collaborate, and progress in their careers. Academic and clinical careers are no different. Numerous social media and technology platforms can be used for career development, networking, and research dissemination including, but not limited to, LinkedIn, ResearchGate, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. With so many outlets, it is important to know how to create a successful social media presence and use technology to your advantage. In this sixth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series, learn more about how social media and technology can boost your career.   

Presented by:

  • Melissa Batchelor-Murphy, PhD, RN-BC, FNP-BC, assistant professor at Duke University School of Nursing. She is a National Hartford Center for Gerontological Nursing Excellence (NHCGNE) Patricia G. Archbold Scholar (2009-2011) and Claire M. Fagin Fellow (2012-2014). She is currently a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar (2014-2017) and a project director for the Duke University School of Nursing’s NIH/ NINR P30 ADAPT Center (2014-2017). She uses social media to disseminate her research findings related to improving nutritional outcomes for residents with dementia in nursing homes, and inform clinical practice. Additionally, she uses social media as a viable means for networking with experts in her field, translating/disseminating the scientific achievements of her colleagues to the public, and developing her voice/ presence in the healthcare arena. In this webinar, she discusses how she developed a plan to increase her social media repertoire (as a nurse scientist, educator, and clinician), and her plans to advance this innovative means of disseminating her science to the next level.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

How to Help Older Adults Recover from Disasters

October 5, 2016

At present, most literature developed by policymakers and planners identify older adults as a vulnerable population that requires additional assistance and resources during disasters. However, it is a constellation of risk factors that make a person vulnerable. The effect of aging, vulnerability, and resilience on responses to disasters is both multidimensional and complex. This webinar provides practical information from the perspective of diverse practice settings (e.g., community-based programs, long-term care services) on how best to support the recovery of older adults after a disaster. This webinar describes best practices and organizational planning considerations related to the unique needs of this population. To highlight key issues, a case scenario is used to illustrate the importance of emergency responders, organizational response, and initiating relationships and partnerships in advance of an emergency or disaster.

Presented by:

  • Lisa M. Brown is Professor and Director of the Trauma Program at Palo Alto University in California. She received her PhD and MS in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and BS in gerontology from City University of New York. She is licensed in Florida and California and is board certified through the American Board of Professional Psychology in Geropsychology.  Dr. Brown’s clinical and research focus is on trauma and resilience, aging, health, vulnerable populations, disasters, and long-term care. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Agency for Healthcare Administration. She serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Aging and is a Fellow of Division 20 and The Gerontological Society of America.
  • Allison Gibson is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Work at Winthrop University in South Carolina. She received her PhD, MSW, and BSW in social work from The Ohio State University. She is clinically licensed in South Carolina (LISW-CP) and Ohio (LISW). Her research interests focus on community-based services for older adults, particularly in the improvement of disaster response services for older persons, their families, and caregivers.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

How to Help Older Adults Prepare for Disasters

September 7, 2016

Among all age groups, older adults are the least prepared for disasters and have the highest rate of disaster-related deaths relative to the general population. This webinar provides information for clinicians, public health officials, emergency managers, researchers, social workers, and policymakers on how to best help older adults prepare for a disaster. Best practices and pre-disaster organizational planning considerations related to the unique needs of this population are discussed and methods to address concerns are offered. This webinar includes a case scenario to deepen group understanding and facilitate discussion.

Presented by:

  • Lisa M. Brown is Professor and Director of the Trauma Program at Palo Alto University in California. She received her PhD and MS in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and BS in gerontology from City University of New York. She is licensed in Florida and California and is board certified through the American Board of Professional Psychology in Geropsychology.  Dr. Brown’s clinical and research focus is on trauma and resilience, aging, health, vulnerable populations, disasters, and long-term care. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Agency for Healthcare Administration. She serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Aging and is a Fellow of Division 20 and The Gerontological Society of America.
  • Jessica Walsh is a PhD candidate in clinical psychology at Palo Alto University in California, specializing in the Trauma Program. She received her BA in social studies from Harvard University in 2010 and her MSc in psychology from the University of East London in 2013. She is currently a psychology extern on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Clinical Team at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Her research interests focus on trauma, aging, and resilience, particularly in the context of improving public policy to better respond to acts of terrorism, war, and disasters.

Supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Strategies to Advance the National Adult Immunization Plan Through a Focus on Influenza

August 2, 2016

Learn about the National Adult Immunization Plan (NAIP) released in February 2016 by the National Vaccine Program Office, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Angela Shen addresses the four NAIP goals and key focus areas. GSA Executive Director and James Appleby shares actionable ideas generated by a multidisciplinary group to advance adult influenza immunization rates using the NAIP framework and key focus objectives. When it comes to saving people’s lives and reducing human disease and affliction, few interventions can match the record of vaccines. Participate in this one-hour webinar and learn ways to use the NAIP as a road map to create your influenza immunization strategy.

Audience: All professionals seeking to increase adult influenza immunization rates

Presented by:

  • Angela Shen, ScD, MPH, Senior Science Policy Advisor, National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO), US Department of Health and Human Services
  • James Appleby, BSPharm, MPH, Executive Director and CEO of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA)

This webinar was developed by GSA and supported by Sanofi Pasteur.

NIA 101: The Review Process
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

June 14, 2016

  • (This webinar is no longer archived on the NIH website)
  • Webinar slides (PDF format)

The NIA and the Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization of The Gerontological Society of America have collaborated to present the webinar “NIA 101: The Review Process,” featuring Chyren Hunter, PhD, from the NIA. This webinar will focus on each step of the grant application review process and respond to questions from the “virtual” audience. At the end of the hour-long webinar, you should have all the information you need to apply for NIA funding.

Presented by:

Chyren Hunter, PhD, is the deputy director and research training officer in the Division of Extramural Activities at the NIA. She oversees and coordinates a broad range of activities that support the review, funding and management of applications and grants to support research on aging.

A Balancing Act: Navigating Work and Life in Early Career
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 26, 2016

Emerging scholars and professionals face unique experiences related to building a successful career while balancing relationships and personal well-being. Training programs often provide useful skills for professional development, yet few of us receive mentorship on how to navigate personal challenges related to family, relocation, work demands, and the difficulty of saying “no.” This interactive webinar provides ESPO members the opportunity learn strategies for personal success while managing a full life of work, relationships, and self.

Presented by:

  • Daniel Kaplan, PhD, is a clinical social worker with expertise in mental and neurological disorders. He is an assistant professor at the Adelphi University School of Social Work. His research includes both intervention studies and workforce development initiatives to optimize care services, clinical interventions, and supportive environments for older adults with mental and neurological disorders living in the community. Kaplan is a co-investigator for the John A. Hartford Foundation-funded NASW Supervisory Leaders in Aging (http://socialworkers.org/sla/). He is the former national director of social services for the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. Kaplan holds clinical social work licensure in New York and Massachusetts, as well as an NASW certification in advanced gerontological clinical social work. He earned his doctorate at Columbia University and then held a postdoctoral research fellowship in the NIMH Geriatric Mental Health Services Research program at the Weill Cornell Institute for Geriatric Psychiatry.

This webinar is supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.


Indigenous Aging Research: Current State of the Science and Future Directions for Research

October 30, 2015

The older adult American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population is growing at a rapid pace. Statistics reported by the Administration on Aging reveal that the number of AI/AN adults aged 65 years and older in the United States is expected to nearly quadruple by 2050. Chronic diseases have a detrimental impact on this population, yet few research studies include AI/AN or indigenous populations worldwide. In this webinar, the presenters discuss studies funded by the National Institutes of Health and international research on indigenous populations, innovative practice-based programs, and the impact of colonization on the health of indigenous older adults. Future directions for research as well as novel approaches are also addressed.

Presented by:

  • Jordan Lewis, PhD, assistant professor, University of Washington School of Social Work and Indigenous Wellness Research Institute
  • Sarah Llanque, RN, PhD, scholar-in-residence, Frisch Institute for Senior Care, Florida State College at Jacksonville

This webinar is supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Networking: Building Solid Career Connections for Emerging Scholars and Professionals
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

October 2, 2015

Throughout your career, the ability to network is a fundamental cornerstone to building strong professional relationships. Because networking takes place in various settings, both online and offline, and oftentimes even before an initial meeting, it is an essential skill to hone. Successful networking can advance your career in the field of aging through attainment of career goals, promoting collaboration and mentorship, and enhancing grantsmanship. Join us for the fourth installment of the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series to learn the ins and outs of networking and how to apply these skills during the upcoming GSA Annual Scientific Meeting in Orlando.

Presented by:

  • Jaime Hughes, MPH, MSW, doctoral student in Social Work and Public Health and a NIH Predoctoral Research Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill. Ms. Hughes has worked previously with the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC) at both the Ann Arbor and Los Angeles VA Medical Centers and currently collaborates with health services researchers at the Durham VA Medical Center. She is currently a member of the ESPO Executive Committee and will begin her term as Chair in November 2015.
  • Katherine Hall, PhD, Assistant Professor of Geriatrics at Duke University and Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in Durham, NC. She is a Past Chair of ESPO’s Executive Committee and currently serves as the Communications Officer of the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Council of Student Organizations (IAGG-CSO).

This webinar is supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Post-Doctoral Opportunities: A Complete Look at the Spectrum of the Post-Doc Experience
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

September 18, 2015

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Office of Special Populations and the Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization (ESPO) of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) have collaborated to present the webinar “Post-Doctoral Opportunities: A Completed Look at the Spectrum of the Post-Doc Experience,” featuring Jamie Justice, PhD, from the University of Colorado, and Todd Ruppar, PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, from the University of Missouri. This webinar will focus on how to identify post-doctoral opportunities; how to make the most of post-doctoral positions; and the next steps to launch a career after the completion of a post-doctoral position. The speakers will address this content from an early career and more senior perspective, commenting on both clinical and academic opportunities.

Presented by:

  • Jamie Justice, PhD, is a Research Fellow in Geriatrics at Wake Forest School of Medicine working with Drs. Steve Kritchevsky and Carol Shively. Her primary research interests are to identify novel biological and behavioral factors that contribute to age-related declines in physical function and to test dietary, lifestyle and drug interventions with potential to slow the trajectory of age-related functional decline. Dr. Justice received her graduate training with Dr. Roger Enoka in the Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory and completed a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Douglas Seals in the Integrative Physiology of Aging Laboratory, both located at the University of Colorado Boulder.
  • Todd Ruppar, PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, serves as assistant professor and associate director of the Meta-Analysis Research Center at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. His research focuses on improving adherence to cardiovascular medications, and he has particular interests in adherence measurement and in how approaches to addressing adherence may impact health disparities. Dr. Ruppar is currently funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program, and has also had research funding through organizations including the PhRMA Foundation, and the John A. Hartford Foundation. As an educator, Dr. Ruppar teaches graduate courses on health behavior change and meta-analysis research methods, and undergraduate courses on public health nursing.

How to Gain Entry and Work with Older Adults in Culturally Grounded and Respectful Approaches

July 29, 2015

This webinar focuses on Dr. Lewis’s research experiences with tribal communities in rural Alaska and urban Seattle. The presentation discusses culturally grounded approaches to research with tribal communities, with an emphasis on community-based participatory research, and will outline recommendations for working respectfully and collaboratively with older adults in tribal communities across the United States. It also highlights the steps of beginning a research study with American Indian and Alaska Native older adults, from developing research questions to disseminating findings.

Presented by:

  • Jordan Lewis, PhD, assistant professor, University of Washington School of Social Work and Indigenous Wellness Research Institute
  • Sarah Llanque, RN, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in cancer, aging, and end-of-life care, University of Utah College of Nursing

This webinar was supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

New Visions for Long-term Services and Supports: The Aging Network & the White House Conference on Aging

June 25, 2015

With the backdrop of the upcoming 2015 White House Conference on Aging, and the challenges of the evolving long-term services and supports (LTSS) system at the state level, this webinar looks to the lessons of the federal Commission on Long-Term Care and the innovations of the aging services network to frame the future for person-centered LTSS.

Moderated by:

  • Brian Lindberg, MSW, MMHS, public policy advisor, GSA

Presented by:

  • Larry Atkins, PhD, executive director, Long-Term Quality Alliance, and president, National Academy of Social Insurance
  • Amy Gotwals, chief of public policy & external affairs, National Association of Area Agencies on Aging
  • Nora Super, MPA, executive director, 2015 White House Conference on Aging

Developed by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and supported by a grant from The SCAN Foundation — advancing a coordinated and easily navigated system of high-quality services for older adults that preserve dignity and independence. Additional support provided by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Nothing With Us Without Us: Exploring Research Partnerships With Native American Communities

April 28, 2015

This presentation seeks to provide a basic overview of the opportunities and challenges in conducting human subjects research in Indian Country. T.J. Holland, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Cultural Resources Supervisor and Chair of the tribe’s Cultural IRB and member of the Medical IRB, will discuss issues such as academic freedom, cultural sensitivity, and best practices for potential researchers who seek to work with Native American communities.

Presented by:

  • T.J. Holland, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Cultural Resources Supervisor; Chair of the tribe’s Cultural IRB; and member of the Medical IRB

This webinar was supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Sleep Health and the Appropriate Use of OTC Sleep Aids in Older Adults: Results from a GSA Summit

March 13, 2015

To engage national stakeholders in a discussion on OTC sleep aid use by older adults and explore strategies for improving safe use of these products, The Gerontological Society of America organized a National Summit on OTC Sleep Aids and Sleep Health in Older Adults. Key findings from the summit include the high prevalence of sleep disturbances and recourse to OTC sleep aids, the long half-life of these medications and possible next-day detrimental effects, frequent anticholinergic side effects and the need for concerted efforts by retail pharmacists and other providers to address sleep health in older adults.

Presented by:

  • Steven M. Albert, PhD, of the University of Pittsburgh
  • Michael V. Vitiello, PhD, of the University of Washington
  • Tom Roth, PhD, of Henry Ford Health Systems

Show Me the Money! Grant Writing for Emerging Scholars and Professionals
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 20, 2015

Grant writing is an essential component of all phases (dissertation, post-doctoral, early career) of your academic and professional careers. Funding is competitive, but gaining skills early in your career can help you learn how to identify funding opportunities and assemble a competitive application. This third webinar in the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series offers tips for successful early career grantsmanship.

Presented by:

  • Laura Tonks Raffield, a PhD candidate in molecular genetics and genomics at Wake Forest School of Medicine and recipient of an F31 Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Institute on Aging
  • Ruth Masterson Creber, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University in the Department of Biomedical Informatics and the School of Nursing, and recipient of an F31 Predoctoral Fellowship from the National Institute of Nursing Research and grants from the John Hartford Foundation and Edna G. Kynett Memorial Foundation

This webinar was sponsored by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Medicare Annual Wellness Visit as Springboard to Detection of Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis, and Post-Diagnosis Support

January 14, 2015

The 2010 Affordable Care Act established the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) as an opportunity for Medicare beneficiaries to receive preventive and assessment services during visits with their primary care providers (PCPs). Detection of cognitive impairment is among required AWV services, yet no specific tools are mandated and no data are available regarding tools used for this purpose. This webinar explains these and related issues being addressed by the GSA Workgroup on Cognitive Impairment Detection and Earlier Diagnosis.

Presented by:

  • Shari M. Ling, MD
  • Katie Maslow, MSW

This webinar was developed by GSA with support from Eli Lilly and Company


Non-Academic Careers in Aging Research
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization/National Institute on Aging Webinar Series)

December 10, 2014

  • (This webinar is no longer archived on National Institutes of Health website)

Ever wondered about career opportunities beyond academia? Want to know how to remain involved and influential in gerontology research and policy outside of university institutions? During this webinar, join GSA members as they discuss their experiences in diverse gerontology roles and ways to explore potential trajectories for non-academic careers in aging.

  • Leland “Bert” Waters, PhD
  • Tracey Gendron, PhD

Navigating the Mentor-Mentee Relationship
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

September 3, 2014

The mentor-mentee relationship is essential to the development and success of scholars and professionals at all career stages. Establishing and cultivating a productive relationship can be uncharted territory for both mentors and mentees. This second installment in the ESPO Professional Development Webinar Series addresses various aspects of the mentor-mentee relationship, including finding mentors, delineating roles and responsibilities of mentors and mentees across career stages, and managing potential challenges.

Presented by:

  • Deborah T. Gold, PhD, Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Sociology, and Psychology and Neuroscience, leader of GSA’s The Mentoring Effect
  • Keith Whitfield, PhD, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, leader of GSA’s The Mentoring Effect

This webinar was supported by The Mentoring Effect, a special project of the GSA Innovation Fund.

Increasing the Odds that Your Manuscript will be Published
(GSA Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization Professional Development Webinar Series)

February 7, 2014

Feeling the pressure to publish? Struggling to know where to publish? Have questions about the publications process? For many new scholars, navigating the publishing path can be both exciting and intimidating. ESPO’s inaugural career development webinar addressed issues that often arise during the race to get published and provided guidance through this sometimes sticky process by highlighting common pitfalls.

Presented by:

  • Merril Silverstein, PhD, Professor of Aging Studies and Editor of The Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences.

This webinar was sponsored by the GSA Innovation Fund. 

Sleep Health and the Appropriate Use of OTC Sleep Aids in Older Adults

January 22, 2014

Nearly half of older adults experience disturbed sleep at least a few nights each week, and about a quarter of older adults report use of a sleep medication in the prior month. In October 2013, The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), in collaboration with Pfizer, engaged national stakeholders in a discussion on over-the-counter (OTC) sleep aid use by older adults and explored strategies for improving safe use of these products. During this webinar, join multidisciplinary experts to examine aging and sleep disturbances, the current state of OTC therapeutics for sleep disturbance, and pharmacist perspective on gaps in therapies and clinical practice.

Presented by:

  • Steven Albert, University of Pittsburgh
  • Phyllis Zee, Northwestern University
  • Thomas Roth, Henry Ford Health Systems
  • Michael Toscani, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy

This webinar was sponsored by Pfizer as part of a collaboration with GSA to support GSA’s campaign to address OTC sleep aids and sleep health in older adults.


Understanding OTC Medication Behaviors of Older Adults: Research Is Needed to Better Understand and Promote Safe and Effective Use

September 25, 2013

Join three clinical and academic experts to explore the key components discussed during the April 2013 National Summit on OTC Medication Behaviors of Older Adults, including future research needs and practical solutions. Topics include OTC medication literacy, the perceptual and cognitive basis of OTC medication decision-making, the interface between clinical and family care in OTC medication use, and technologies to support optimal OTC medication use.

This webinar was in partnership with the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA).


Learn What’s Happening with NIA Grants and Funding

June 9, 2011

GSA welcomed National Institute on Aging Director Richard J. Hodes, MD, for a discussion on federal budget constraints, their impact on NIA, strategies his agency is employing to address them, and a look toward the future. Hodes also addressed the institute’s tight payline (an agency’s funding cutoff point for grant applications), an issue of great concern to the research community.

Presented by:

  • Richard J. Hodes, MD, director, National Institute on Aging

This webinar was co-sponsored by the Friends of the National Institute on Aging and the American Geriatrics Society, and was supported by the GSA Innovation Fund.

Advocacy Training for Take Action Week

September 13, 2011

In anticipation of September's Take Action Week, GSA's policy advisor, Brian Lindberg, led a conversation about how to advocate for federal research funding, and other issues important to GSA members. Lindberg discussed how to set-up a meeting with your Senator or Member of the House of Representatives, what to expect and how to prepare for the meeting, and the basics of communicating your message.

Presented by:

  • Brian Lindberg, MMHS, GSA policy advisor

Thinking Inside the Box:  A Strategic Approach to Message-Driven Posters

October 4, 2011

Scientific posters. You've seen them. You've created them. Now, it's time to look at them in a whole new way. GSA's Annual Scientific Meeting features several poster sessions, and many of you will have the opportunity to present your research and ideas to a large and varied audience. If you're interested in improving your poster and making the most of these sessions, join us for this interactive webinar featuring John Beilenson, president of Strategic Communications & Planning, who has been advising scientists about communications and their posters for more than a decade.

Presented by:

  • John Beilinson, president, Strategic Communications & Planning

The Effectiveness of Survivorship Models in Older Individuals
(Comparative Effectiveness in Older Cancer Patients: Age Versus Health Status Series)

November 21, 2010

This webinar highlights different considerations between younger and older individuals as it pertains to functional decline, psychosocial issues, and the role of caregivers in cancer survivors; discusses the role of functional status and comorbidity as it pertains to functional decline, psychosocial issues, and the role of caregivers in cancer survivors; and defins important unanswered questions that would benefit from comparative effectives with respect to functional decline, psychosocial issues, and the role of caregivers in cancer survivors

Presented by:

  • Charles W. Given PhD
  • Arash Naeim MD, PhD
  • Julia Hannum Rose PhD

This series, recorded during GSA's 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting, includes three sessions on topics related to comparative effectiveness research in older cancer patients. It is designed to create new opportunities for a broader national audience to discuss and provide suggestions of areas and questions that require comparative effectiveness evaluation in order to help both the provider and the older cancer patient.

The series was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and co-sponsored by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the American Geriatrics Society, and the GSA Research on Cancer and Aging Informal Interest Group.

The Effectiveness of Adjuvant Therapy in Older Individuals
(Comparative Effectiveness in Older Cancer Patients: Age Versus Health Status Series)

November 20, 2010

This webinar highlights different considerations between younger and older individuals as it pertains to breast, colon, and lung cancer adjuvant therapy; discussed the role of functional status and comorbidity with respect to the value of breast, colon, and lung cancer adjuvant therapy; and defines important unanswered questions that would benefit from comparative effectives with respect to breast, colon, and lung cancer adjuvant therapy.

Presented by:

  • Arti Hurria MD
  • Arash Naeim MD, PhD

This series, recorded during GSA's 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting, includes three sessions on topics related to comparative effectiveness research in older cancer patients. It is designed to create new opportunities for a broader national audience to discuss and provide suggestions of areas and questions that require comparative effectiveness evaluation in order to help both the provider and the older cancer patient.

The series was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and co-sponsored by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the American Geriatrics Society, and the GSA Research on Cancer and Aging Informal Interest Group.

The Effectiveness of Cancer Screening in Older Individuals
(Comparative Effectiveness in Older Cancer Patients: Age Versus Health Status Series)

November 21, 2010

This webinar highlights different considerations between younger and older individuals as it pertains to colon, prostate, and breast cancer screening; discussed the role of functional status and comorbidity with respect to the value of colon, prostate, and breast cancer screening; and defines important unanswered questions that would benefit from comparative effectives with respect to colon, prostate, and breast cancer screening.

Presented by:

  • Erica S. Breslau PhD, MPH
  • William Dale MD, PhD
  • Arash Naeim MD, PhD
  • Janine Overcash PhD, GNP-BC

This series, recorded during GSA's 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting, includes three sessions on topics related to comparative effectiveness research in older cancer patients. It is designed to create new opportunities for a broader national audience to discuss and provide suggestions of areas and questions that require comparative effectiveness evaluation in order to help both the provider and the older cancer patient.

The series was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and co-sponsored by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, the American Geriatrics Society, and the GSA Research on Cancer and Aging Informal Interest Group.

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