Join AGHE

AGHE offers three institutional membership categories and an individual membership.

Membership Type

Price

Eligibility

Educational Institution

Two-Year College

$398/year

 

For educational institutions with a demonstrated interest in initiating, developing, expanding, and improving education, research, and training programs in gerontology and geriatrics.

2 Academy Representatives

Educational Institution

Four-Year College

$597/year

 

For educational institutions with a demonstrated interest in initiating, developing, expanding, and improving education, research, and training programs in gerontology and geriatrics.

3 Academy Representatives

Educational Institution

Professional School

$597/year

 

For educational institutions with a demonstrated interest in initiating, developing, expanding, and improving education, research, and training programs in gerontology and geriatrics.

3 Academy Representatives

Educational Institution

University

$796/year

 

For educational institutions with a demonstrated interest in initiating, developing, expanding, and improving education, research, and training programs in gerontology and geriatrics.

4 Academy Representatives

Educational Affiliate

 

$199/year

 

For accredited academic institutions with gerontology/geriatric educators and/or course offerings in aging, but without a formal gerontology or geriatrics program. A formal program is defined as: (a) one offering a degree, certificate, concentration, specialization, emphasis, or minor in gerontology; or (b) one identified as a research and/or clinical training center in gerontology/geriatrics.

1 Academy Representative

Organizational Affiliate $398/year

For organizations with an interest in education, research, and training in gerontology, other than institutions of higher learning.

2 Academy Representatives

Individual

$199/year

For individuals not affiliated with an AGHE institutional membership who share the vision and mission of AGHE and wish to support the efforts of AGHE through membership.

  

General Resources Member Benefits

  1. Annual Meeting: For faculty, administrators, and students - focuses on teaching about aging issues and administering gerontology and geriatrics programs.
  2. Member Institution Support: Faculty, administrators, and students are supported through AGHE’s many networks including annual meetings, teaching resources, website, advocacy, and committees.
  3. Publications: The official AGHE journal is Gerontology & Geriatrics Education®. In 2019, AGHE members get a discounted individual subscription rate which can be obtained through Taylor & Francis Group's Customer Service department (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). AGHE also publishes the online newsletter, AGHExchange four times per year.
  4. AGHE Connect: A professional networking tool designed to connect members and share ideas across interest areas. AGHE Connect provides access to useful resources, valuable discussions, and a collaborative space for all.

For Academic Programs, Centers and Departments

  1. Program Review & Development: The AGHE Standards and Guidelines document includes gerontology and geriatrics curriculum and program parameters for all levels of programs – associate, bachelors, masters and doctoral.
  2. Program Recognition: The AGHE Program of Merit (POM) recognition is available to academic gerontology and geriatrics programs that meet AGHE Standards and Guidelines and other measures of program quality.
  3. National Links and Visibility: The Online Directory of Educational Programs in Gerontology and Geriatrics describes educational programs in gerontology and geriatrics at schools worldwide. AGHE members receive an exclusive benefit: an enhanced listing that provides greater detail than the basic entry, assisting in promoting their visibility and enrollment.

For Individuals (Administrators, Faculty and Students)

  1. Professional Recognition: Awards and acknowledgements that recognize the contributions of faculty, students, administrators, organizations and individuals at AGHE’s annual meeting, in the meeting program, and on the website.
  2. Fellow Status: An individual who has been a member of AGHE for a minimum of five years and is currently a member may apply for fellow status recognizing outstanding contributions to gerontology and geriatrics education.
  3. Special Programs: Careers in Aging Week and other special projects.
  4. Leadership Opportunities: AGHE provides faculty, administrators, and students with leadership opportunities on its many committees, and Executive Committee.
  5. GSA Member Benefits: Academy Representatives and Individual Members also have access to all GSA member benefits.

History

Established in 1974 (as the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education), the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE) is the GSA's education organization of colleges and universities that offer education, training, and research programs in the field of aging. AGHE currently has more than 60 institutional members throughout the United States, Canada, and abroad. 

On January 1, 1999, AGHE became an educational unit of The Gerontological Society of America. On March 2, 2018, AGHE approved a new set of bylaws — including changing its name from the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education to the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education — and became the educational organization of GSA. Learn more about this transformation and AGHE's full history.

Goals

The purpose of AGHE is to foster the commitment of higher education to the field of aging through education, research, and public service. We provide:

  • Unity through common organization;
  • A forum for debate of issues regarding the advancement of gerontology, educational opportunities for older people, and education of society about aging;
  • A network base for communication, interorganizational cooperation and leadership with associations of higher education, public officials, volunteers and others interested in aging education; and
  • Leadership on policies and issues related to higher education.

These goals are accomplished through programs and services such as annual meeting programming, the AGHExchange newsletter, and Online Directory of Educational Programs in Gerontology, technical assistance in the development and expansion of academic gerontology programs, research on gerontology education and manpower needs for the field of aging, and the advocacy of public and private support for aging education and research.

Mission

  1. To advance gerontology and geriatrics education in academic institutions; and
  2. To provide leadership and support of gerontology and geriatrics education faculty and students at education institutions.

AGHE and its members are strongly committed to the well-being of older adults. Together, AGHE and aging-studies programs in institutions of higher education strive to:

  1. Prepare service delivery personnel who will work directly with older adults;
  2. Train educators who specialize in the physical, psycho-social, and policy domains of aging;
  3. Educate the society at large about the processes of aging and the implications of an aging society; and leadership on policies and issues related to higher education.

Please choose an award name to view specific details and requirements.


 

Clark Tibbitts (1903 - 1985)

Clark Tibbitts was an architect of the field of gerontological education - an academic who spent most of his career in the federal government as an advocate for the development of aging education, training, and research programs in institutions of higher education. Tibbitts was the director of the Institute for Human Adjustment at the University of Michigan for 12 years before moving to Washington, D.C., in 1949 to serve as an specialist in aging with the agency that preceded the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Health and Human Services. He retired in 1983 as the special assistant to the U.S. Commissioner on Aging after 35 years of government service.

During those three decades, his contributions and accomplishments were many, including the following: he directed the 1950 National Conference on Aging and helped develop the 1961 White House Conference on Aging; chaired the HEW Committee on Aging and Geriatrics in the early 1950s; founded the Administration on Aging (AoA); and founded and directed AoA's Education and Training Program and its National Clearinghouse on Aging.

He played a major role in planning, organizing, and convening many international conferences on aging from the 1950's through the 1980's. He authored more than 100 publications; the most notable, undoubtedly, was the Handbook of Social Gerontology: Societal Aspects of Aging, which for a decade was the principal textbook on aging.

Clark Tibbitts died in October 1985 at age 82, leaving a legacy of accomplishments in academic institutions throughout the world. Through a combination of personal friendships and professional expertise, he fostered a federal commitment to the improvement of the lives of older persons through the development and growth of hundreds of academic gerontology programs.

The Clark Tibbitts Award

The AGHE award was established in 1980 to recognize those individuals and organizations that have made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of gerontology as a field of study in institutions of higher education. In 1985, AGHE's Executive Committee renamed the AGHE award the Clark Tibbitts Award to recognize the major role that Tibbitts played in establishing and nurturing the field of gerontological education.

In addition, Tibbitts was key in establishing the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education. Tibbitts and colleague Wilma Donahue (University of Michigan) were the first recipients of the AGHE award in 1981.

Purpose of the Award

This award, named for an architect of the field of gerontological education, is given by AGHE each year to an individual or organization that has made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of gerontology and/or geriatrics education.

The awardee receives an engraved plaque and delivers a lecture at the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Nominees must have made a national impact on gerontology and/or geriatrics education, have had significant involvement in gerontology and/or geriatrics education, and have advanced the goals and mission of the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education. At the time of the nomination, the nominee must be affiliated with an AGHE member institution.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.     

Requirements

To be considered for the award, the nominator must submit, a nominations packet that includes a primary letter of nomination, a maximum of four supporting letters of nomination, a copy of the nominee's curriculum vitae or resume, and a headshot. Nominators are encouraged to work closely with nominees to ensure the strongest and most complete nomination package possible. Self-nominations are not permitted.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018 Marilyn R. Gugliucci | University of New England
2017 JoAnn Damron-Rodriguez | University of California, Los Angeles
2016 Case Western Reserve University
2015 Suzanne R. Kunkel | Miami University
2014 Harry "Rick" Moody | AARP
2013 Marie A. Bernard | National Institute on Aging/National Institute of Health
2012 John A. Krout | Ithaca College
2011 Edward F. Ansello | Virginia Commonwealth University
2010 Frank J. Whittington | George Mason University
2009 Larry Polivka | University of South Florida
2008 Leonard W. Poon | University of Georgia
2007 Robert Binstock | Case Western Reserve University
2006 William J. McAuley | George Mason University
2005 Sally Newman | University of Pittsburgh
2004 Jon Hendricks | Oregon State University
2003 Phoebe Liebig | University of Southern California
2002 Stephen Cutler | University of Vermont
2001 Bernice Parlak | Health Resources and Services Administration
2000 Carroll Estes | University of California, San Francisco
1999 Armin Grams | University of Vermont
1998 James H. Schulz | Brandeis University
1997 Scott A. Bass | University of Maryland, Baltimore County
1996 Tom Hickey | University of Michigan
1995 E. Percil Stanford | San Diego State University
1994 Harvey L. Sterns | The University of Akron
1993 David A. Peterson | University of Southern California
1992 Joseph Britton | The Pennsylvania State University
1991 Harold Johnson | University of Michigan
1990 Midwest Council for Social Research in Aging
1989 Wayne Vasey | University of South Florida
1988 Dorothy Coons | University of Michigan
1987 George Maddox | Duke University
1986 *Walter Beattie | Syracuse University
1985 Mildred Seltzer | Miami University
1984 Hiram Friedsam | University of North Texas
1983 James Birren | University of Southern California
1982 Robert Havighurst | University of Chicago
1981 Clark Tibbitts | Administration on Aging & Wilma Donahue | University of Michigan
* renamed to Clark Tibitts Award


Hiram J. Friedsam Mentorship Award

Purpose of the Award

Hiram J. Friedsam was a professor, co-founder, and director of the Center for Studies in Aging and Dean of the School of Community Service at the University of North Texas. The University of North Texas established the first gerontology program in the state of Texas and one of the first in the nation. He was an outstanding teacher, researcher, colleague, and mentor to students, faculty, and administrators, and a past-president of AGHE. The purpose of this award is to recognize those who emulate Dr. Friedsam's excellence in mentorship.

The awardee receives an engraved plaque, $500 cash award (dependent upon funding), and delivers a lecture on mentoring at the GSA Annual Scientific Meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Nominees must have contributed to gerontological and/or geriatrics education through excellence in mentorship to students, faculty, or administrators and have advanced the goals and mission of the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education. At the time of the nomination, the nominee must be affiliated with an AGHE member institution.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.   

Requirements

To be considered for the award, the nominator must submit, a nominations packet that includes a primary letter of nomination, a maximum of four supporting letters of nomination, a copy of the nominee's curriculum vitae, and a headshot.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018 Phillip G. Clark | University of Rhode Island
2017 Kelvin J. A. Davies | University of Southern California
2016 Jan Abushakrah | Portland Community College
2015 Jennifer C. Mendez | Wayne State University
2014 Nina M. Silverstein | University of Massachusetts Boston
2013 Lesa Lorenzen Huber | Indiana University
2012 Marilyn R. Gugliucci | University of New England
2011 Dena Shenk | University of North Carolina Charlotte
2010 David A. Chiriboga | University of South Florida
2009 Suzanne R. Kunkel | Miami University


Mildred M. Seltzer Distinguished Service Honor

Purpose of the Honor

The Mildred M. Seltzer Distinguished Service Honor is presented annually by AGHE to honor colleagues who are near retirement or recently retired.

Recipient(s) receive a personalized certificate at the AGHE Business Meeting at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Recipients are individuals who have been actively involved in AGHE through service on committees, as elected officers, or have provided leadership in one of AGHE's grant-funded projects. At the time of the nomination, the nominee must be affiliated with an AGHE member institution.

Selection

Nominees will be reviewed and honoree(s) selected by the AGHE Awards Committee. Multiple honors may be given annually.

Requirements

To be considered for this honor, the nominator must submit, a nominations packet that includes a copy of the nominee's curriculum vitae.

Nomination Process

Submit using the online nominations portal by July 31.

Past Recipients

2018
Sandra L. McGuire | University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Harvey L. Sterns | The University of Akron
Edwin Rosenberg | Appalachian State University
Graham D. Rowles | University of Kentucky

2017
Bradley J. Fisher | Missouri State University
Beryl D. Goldman | Kendal Outreach, LLC
Jim P. Mitchell | East Carolina University
Maureen E. Power | Worcester State College
Kathy A. Segrist | Ball State University
Sue Ward | American River College

2016
Barbara Gillogly | American River College
Lynne Hodgson | Quinnipiac University
Bob G. Knight | University of Southern California
Leslie A. Morgan | University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Sheldon "Shelly" Steinhauser | Metropolitan State University of Denver

2015
Dena Shenk | University of North Carolina Charlotte
Eleanor Krassen Covan | University of North Caroline Wilmington

2014
Harry "Rick" Moody | AARP
Sally M. Newman | University of Pittsburgh

2013
Alton C. Dubois | Concordia University Chicago

2012
William J. McAuley | George Mason University
Leonard W. Poon | University of Georgia
Paul A. Roodin | SUNY Oswego

2011
Betty D. Dodson | University of Nevada, Reno
Lisa Groger | Miami University
John A. Krout | Ithaca College
Betsy M. Sprouse | AARP

2010
C. Joanne Grabinski | Eastern Michigan University
Mary Alice Wolf | Saint Joseph College

2009
Stephen J. Cutler | University of Vermont
Althea Taylor-Jones | Winston-Salem State University

2008
John A. Belzer | University of Oklahoma
Elizabeth B. Douglass | University of Maryland Baltimore County
Iris A. Parham | Virginia Commonwealth University
Novella Perrin | University of Central Missouri
Charles Schmidtke | Canisius College
Anthony Traxler | Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville

2007
May Futrell | University of Massachusetts
Phoebe S. Liebig | University of Southern California
Joan Wood | University of California, San Francisco

2006
Robert N. Gandee | Slippery Rock University
Gloria Heinemann | University at Buffalo, SUNY
William Lane | SUNY Cortland
Edward E. Morgan, Jr. | Bowling Green State University
David L. Treybig | Baldwin-Wallace College
Derrel R. Watkins | Saint Paul School of Theology

2005
Sara Aleman | Northern Arizona University
Steven Applewhite | University of Houston
William E. Arnold | Arizona State University
Susan J. Eklund | Indiana University
Nancy Gabrielsen | Slippery Rock University
Jo Ann Luckie | Del Mar College
Gwen Yeo | Stanford University


Distinguished Faculty Award

Purpose of the Award

The Distinguished Faculty Award recognizes persons whose teaching stands out as exemplary, innovative, of impact, or any combination thereof. The Distinguished Faculty Awardee will provide a lecture at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Note: Those nominated must be willing and able to attend the GSA Annual Meeting and present a lecture during the meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Full-time faculty members at an AGHE affiliated institution with a minimum of five years of teaching experience are eligible to be nominated for this award.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.

Requirements

The nominator is responsible for submitting:

1. Letter of Nomination: The letter should address the purpose and qualifications of the Distinguished Faculty Nominee. The letter should emphasize teaching, rather than research, professional activity, or public service (unless those activities bear directly on teaching excellence). Maximum: 2 pages.

2. Letters of Support: A minimum of two letters of support should be collected from colleagues of the Distinguished Faculty Nominee (within and/or outside his/her current institution; current and/or past undergraduate and/or graduate students; and/or representatives of the institutional administration). Maximum: 2 pages each.

3. Curriculum Vitae

Nominators are encouraged to work closely with nominees to ensure the strongest and most complete nomination package possible. Self-nominations are not permitted.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018  Phyllis A. Greenberg | St. Cloud State University
2017  Judith A. Sugar | University of Nevada, Reno
2016  Elizabeth M. Zelinski | University of Southern California
2015  Graham D. Rowles | University of Kentucky
2014  Cynthia Hancock | University of North Carolina Charlotte
2012  Leslie A. Morgan | University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Jennifer R. Sasser | Maryhurst University
2011  Eleanor Covan | University of North Carolina Wilmington and Mary B. Ligon | York College of Pennsylvania
2010  Karen A. Hooker | Oregon State University and Rona J. Karasik | Saint Cloud State University
2009  Laura K. Donorfio | University of Connecticut and Karen F. Kopera-Frye | University of Nevada, Reno
2008  Dana Burr Bradley | Western Kentucky University and E. Ayn Welleford | Virginia Commonwealth University
2007  Robert M. Beland | University of Florida and Darlene Yee-Melichar | San Francisco State University


Rising Star Early Career Faculty Award

Purpose of the Award

The AGHE Rising Star Early Career Faculty Award recognizes new faculty whose teaching and/or leadership stands out as impactful and innovative. The AGHE Rising Star Early Career Faculty Awardee will provide a lecture at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Note: Those nominated must be willing and able to attend the GSA Annual Meeting and present a lecture during the meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Full-time faculty members at an AGHE affiliated institution with a maximum of five years (at the nomination submission due date) post degree-award teaching experience are eligible to be nominated for this award.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.

Requirements

The nominator is responsible for submitting:

1. Letter of Nomination: The letter should address the purpose and qualifications of the AGHE Rising Star Early Career Faculty Nominee. The letter should emphasize teaching and/or leadership, rather than research, professional activity, or public service (unless those activities bear directly on teaching excellence). Maximum: 2 pages.

2. Letters of Support: A maximum of four letters of support (minimum of two) should be collected from colleagues of the AGHE Rising Star Early Career Faculty Nominee (within and/or outside his/her current institution; current and/or past undergraduate and/or graduate students; and/or representatives of the institutional administration). Maximum: 2 pages each.

3. Curriculum Vitae

Nominators are encouraged to work closely with nominees to ensure the strongest and most complete nomination package possible. Self-nominations are not permitted.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018  Eric C. Schoenmakers | Fontys University of Applied Sciences
2017  Özgür Arun | Akdeniz University
2016  Pamela Pitman Brown | Winston-Salem State University
2015  Tina M. Kruger | Indiana State University


Part-Time/Adjunct Faculty Honor

Purpose of the Honor

Nationwide, reliance on part-time and/or adjunct faculty to teach gerontology and/or geriatrics courses is very high. Without the efforts and dedication of these individuals, often at extremely low compensation, gerontology and geriatrics programs might not be able to deliver a full curriculum. Accordingly, AGHE invites you to nominate one of these individuals so that he/she might be formally honored for contributions to gerontology and/or geriatrics education at your institution.

Recipient(s) receive a personalized certificate at the AGHE Business Meeting at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Each member institution may nominate one part-time/adjunct faculty member per year.

  • Nominees should demonstrate high quality teaching as documented by peer and/or student evaluations.
  • Nominees should also demonstrate a long-term commitment (at least five years) to gerontology and/or geriatrics education both in the classroom and beyond.
  • Full-time faculty are not eligible to receive this award even if their gerontology and/or geriatrics assignments are part-time.

This is a honor rather than a competitive award. Those nominated are not required to attend the GSA Annual Meeting or be active members of AGHE.

Selection

Nominees will be reviewed and an awardee selected by the AGHE Awards Committee. Several individuals may be recognized each year.

Requirements

The nominator is responsible for submitting the nominees curriculum vitae or resume.

Nominators are encouraged to work closely with nominees to ensure the strongest and most complete nomination package possible. Self-nominations are not permitted.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018 Roger Anunsen | Portland Community College and Amanda P. Weber | Towson University
2017 Robert S. Anderson Jr. | University of New England, Lisa A. Kendall | Ithaca College and Robin Sherman | University of Massachusetts Boston
2016 Gregory D. Bearce | University of Southern California
2014 Victoria S. Thieme | University of New England, Judith Griffin | University of Massachusetts Boston and Barbara Hughes Leasure | Carroll Lutheran Village
2013 David Oliver | University of Missouri-Columbia
2012 Reeve Lipworth Goldhaber | Boston University and Louise M. Murray | University of North Carolina Charlotte
2011 Charlotte Paolini | University of New England
2009 Darlene Heian | Utica College
2008 Christa Caldarale-Ahern | The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey and Catherine Ivy | Georgia State University
2007 Anne Summer | University of New England, John Hogan | Oregon State University and Marilynn G. Goering | Madonna University
2006 Kaye Herzer | Spokane Falls Community College


Administrative Leadership Honor

Purpose of the Honor

The Administrative Leadership Honor honors administrators on AGHE member campuses who have made exceptional efforts in support of gerontology and/or geriatrics education. Recipient(s) receive a personalized certificate at the AGHE Business Meeting at the GSA Annual Meeting. 

Eligibility Criteria

Nominees should be administrators above the level of everyday program operation, such as Deans, Provosts, or Presidents. Such individuals must have 'gone the extra mile' to support gerontology and/or geriatrics education on campus. At the time of the nomination, the nominee must be affiliated with an AGHE member institution.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.

Requirements

The nominator is responsible for submitting the nominees curriculum vitae or resume.

Nominators are encouraged to work closely with nominees to ensure the strongest and most complete nomination package possible. Self-nominations are not permitted.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018  Joann M. Montepare | Lasell College
2017  John R. Bartle | University of Nebraska, Omaha, J. Kevin Eckert, PhD | University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Danielle N. Ripich | University of New England
2016  * Pinchas Cohen | University of Southern California
2015  Not Awarded
2014  Robbyn R. Wacker | University of Northern Colorado
2013  Judy L. Genshaft | University of South Florida
2012  Nadine A. Coudret | University of Southern Indiana
2011-10 Not Awarded
2009  Tammy M. Bray | Oregon State University
2008   Malinda Orlin | The University of Maryland in Baltimore and Scott Bass | University of Maryland Baltimore County
* Award was changed to an honor in April 2016


David A. Peterson Award

AGHE, in conjunction with Taylor and Francis, has instituted the David A. Peterson Award for the Best Article in the volume of Gerontology & Geriatrics Education (G&GE), the official journal of AGHE. All articles accepted for publication in G&GE, beginning with Volume 26, are considered for the award. For each volume, one recipient and one honorable mention will be named.

The purpose of this award is to recognize excellence in scholarship in academic gerontology. In addition to writing style, manuscripts are evaluated on innovation, the soundness of their approach, and their significance to and implications for gerontology and/or geriatrics education.

In naming the award after Dr. David A. Peterson, we salute his pioneering work in gerontology education and his contributions to AGHE. This award has been made possible by a generous donation from The Haworth Press.

Purpose of the Award

The purpose of this award is to recognize to recognize excellence in scholarship in academic gerontology. The awardee receives a personalized award certificate and a $250 cash award. The Honorable Mention recipient receives a personalized award certificate. Both awards will be presented during the AGHE Business Meeting at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

In addition to writing style, manuscripts are evaluated on innovation, the soundness of their approach, and their significance to and implications for gerontology and/or geriatrics education. At the time of the nomination, the nominee must be affiliated with an AGHE member institution.

Selection

A member of the G&GE Editorial Staff with participation of the AGHE Awards Committee Chair will review nomiantions and select an awardee.

Nomination Process

There is no nomination process; in April the editor of the G&GE provides the four top papers for the volume to the subcommittee for review and selection.

Past Recipients

Vol. 38 2017  

 Liz Seidel | ACRIA
"Training senior service providers about HIV and aging: Evaluation of a multiyear, multicity initiative"

Vol. 37 2016   Tina M. Kruger | Indiana State University
"Beyond Assessment: Conducting Theoretically Grounded Research on Service-Learning in Gerontology Courses."
 

Vol. 36 2015

 Ariadne Meiboom | VU University Medical Center
"The Hidden Curriculum of the Medical Care for Elderly Patients in Medical Education: A Qualitative Study."
 Vol. 35 2014  

Feliciano Villar | University of Barcelona
"Tell Me Your Life: Including Life Stories in an Adult Development and Aging Course."

 Vol. 34 2013  Paul Roodin | SUNY College at Oswego
"Intergenerational Service Learning: A Review of Recent Literature and Directions for the Future."
 Vol. 33 2013  

Leslie A. Morgan | University of Maryland, Baltimore County
“Paradigms in the Gerontology Classroom: Connections and Challenges to Learning."

Honorable Mention
Anabel O. Pelham | San Francisco State University
“Professionalizing Gerontology: Why AGHE Must Accredit Gerontology Programs.”

 Vol. 31 2011

 Thomas M. Meuser | University of Missouri - St. Louis
“The American Medical Association Older Driver Curriculum for Health Professionals: Changes in Trainee Confidence, Attitudes & Practice Behavior."

Honorable Mention
John A. Krout | Ithaca College
“Intergenerational Service-Learning with Elders: Multidisciplinary Activities and Outcomes.”

 Vol. 30 2010  

Noell Rowan | University of Louisville
“Innovative Interdisciplinary Training in and Delivery of Evidence-Based Geriatric Services: Creating a Bridge with Social Work and Physical Therapy."

Honorable Mention
Paul T. Stolee | University of Waterloo
“Sustained Transfer of Knowledge to Practice in Long-Term Care: Facilitators and Barriers of a Mental Health Learning Initiative.”

 Vol. 29 2009  

Nina M. Silverstein | University of Massachusetts Boston
"Students Explore Livable Communities."

Honorable Mention
Emily J. Robbins | Miami University
“Promoting Active Engagement in Health Research: Lessons Learned from an Undergraduate Gerontology Capstone Course.”

 

 Vol. 28 2008

 

Brent C. Williams | University of Michigan
“Successful Implementation of a Faculty Development Program in Geriatrics for Non-Primary Care Physician Educators."

Honorable Mention
Constance L. Coogle | Virginia Commonwealth University
“The Value of Geriatric Care Enhancement Training for Direct Service Workers.”

 Vol. 27 2007  

Diane C. Calleson | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
“Effectiveness of Mailing 'Bathing Without a Battle' to All US Nursing Homes.”

Honorable Mention
John A. Krout | Ithaca College
“The Impact of Gerontology Inclusion on 12th Grade Student Perceptions of Aging, Older Adults and Working with Elders.”

 

 

Vol. 26 2006

 

 

 

Sharon V. King | Georgia State University
“Gerontology and Research Education in Kenya: Establishing a U.S.-African Partnership in Aging.”

Honorable Mention
Lorraine T. Dorfman | University of Iowa
“A Diffusion of Innovations Approach to Gerontological Curriculum Enrichment: Institutionalizing and Sustaining Curricular Change.”

 


 

Book Award for Best Children's Literature on Aging

Purpose of the Award

The purpose of the AGHE Book Award for Best Children’s Literature on Aging is to recognize positive portrayals of older adults in children’s literature; the Award is given every other year.

Following the selection of the recipients, the K-12 Gerontology Education Interest Group shall send announcement letters to both the American Library Association and the Illinois University School of Library Science Center for Children’s Books. Announcement letters will be sent to the publisher of the Honoree and Honorable Mention books and the Committee will work with the publishers to inform the authors and to affix the AGHE Book Award seal to the books.

Eligibility Criteria

There will be two categories:(a) Primary Reader (pre K—2) and (b) Elementary Reader (3—5 grade).  There will be one “Honoree” and one “Honorable Mention” in each category.

Nomination Process

The Chair of the AGHE K-12 Committee shall appoint a chair and 2—3 members to serve on a Children’s Book Award Subcommittee. The chair of this Subcommittee will be a member of the AGHE Awards Committee.

The Children’s Book Award Subcommittee will identify books in the Primary Reader and the Elementary Reader categories that address aging from the lists of the previous year’s honorees selected by the American Library Association (published in January) and the Illinois University School of Library Science Center for Children’s Books (published in February). The Subcommittee will further solicit nominations of books in both categories from AGHE members through the AGHExchange and other communication avenues. It will inform publishers of the nominated books about the awards-selection process and request a review copy for each member of the Children’s Book Award Subcommittee. This letter must be approved by the AGHE Awards Committee and AGHE President prior to it being sent.

The Children’s Book Award Subcommittee will review the nominations. Each member of the Subcommittee will read each book and rate it on a scale of 3 (1 = Poor, 2 = Acceptable, and 3 = Outstanding) on these five criteria:

a. Portrayal of meaningful aging
b. Portrayal of positive intergenerational relations
c. Diversity e.g, gender, race, ethnicity, disability
d. Appeal
e. Realism of story line

Children’s Book Award Subcommittee members will be expected to excuse themselves from the judging if they have a conflict of interest related to any of the nominated books, and a replacement will be identified from the K-12 Committee.

The chair of the Children’s Book Award Subcommittee shall tabulate the ratings to determine the rankings. The Honoree and Honorable Mention awards will be given respectively to the books with the highest and second highest ratings in each category. The results will be shared with the K-12 Committee and the AGHE Awards Committee before being forwarded to the AGHE Executive Committee for approval.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2020

Past Recipients

2019 Not Awarded

2018
PRIMARY READER: It’s Just Aging by Eliah Takushi, Carly Tan, and Colby Takeda
ELEMENTARY READER: Hour of the Bees by Lindsay Eagar

2017 Not Awarded

2016 
PRIMARY READER: Papa Chagall, Tell Us a Story by Laurence Anholt
ELEMENTARY READER: The Turtle of Oman by Naomi Shihab Nye
HONORABLE MENTION: Nana in the City by Lauren Castillo

2015 Not Awarded

2014
PRIMARY READER: Shoebox Sam by Mary Brigid Barrett
ELEMENTARY READER: Marching with Aunt Susan: Susan B. Anthony and the Fight for Women's Suffrage by Claire Rudolph Murphy

2013-2012 Not Awarded

2011
PRIMARY READER: Sometimes It's Grandmas and Grandpas: Not Mommies and Daddies by Gayle Byrne

2010
PRIMARY READER: Niwechihaw/I Help by Caitlin Dale Nicholson
ELEMENTARY READER: Ain't Nobody A Stranger to Me by Ann Grifalconi and Jerry Pickney

2009
PRIMARY READER: Rock, Brock and the Savings Shock by Sheila Bair
ELEMENTARY READER: The Golden Rule by Ilene Cooper


Student Leadership Award

Purpose of the Award

The Student Leadership Award recognizes a student whose leadership has advanced the goals and mission of the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE) as well as the respective goals of his/her AGHE-affiliated institution. Nominees should exemplify a commitment to scholarship and advancing the cause of gerontology and/or geriatrics among their peers.

Nominees should demonstrate a commitment to the values of justice and service, think critically and creatively, and epitomize peer-mentorship.

The awardee receives a personalized award certificate, a letter to their program chair and academic mentor/advisor on behalf of the Association, and will be recognized during the AGHE Business Meeting at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Eligibility Criteria

Nominees must be a full- or part-time student at an AGHE-affiliated institution at the time of nomination. Nominees should demonstrate active involvement in service and leadership at both at the institutional level and within AGHE.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.

Requirements

The nominator is responsible for submitting:

1. Letter of Nomination: The letter should address the purpose and qualifications of the Student Leadership Nominee cognizant of the Student Leadership Award description. The letter should emphasize service and student membership in professional organizations, including AGHE, rather than an exemplary academic record. Maximum: 2 pages.
 
2. Letter of Support: A minimum of one letter of support (and maximum of four) should be collected from colleagues of the Student Leadership Nominee (these may include student and/or professional colleagues within and/or outside the Nominee’s current institution). Maximum: 2 pages each.

3. Curriculum Vitae or Resume of the Student Leadership Nominee

Nominators are encouraged to work closely with nominees to ensure the strongest and most complete nomination package possible. Self-nominations are not permitted.

Nomination Process

Nomination submission closed on March 31, 2019.

Submission Deadline

March 31, 2019

Past Recipients

2018 Catherine Pérez | University of Southern California
2017 Colleen R. Bennett | University of Maryland, Baltimore County
2016 Amy J. Plant | Youngstown State University
2015 Katherine Humber | University of Maryland, Baltimore County


Graduate Student Paper Award

Award Guidelines

The purpose of this award is to recognize excellence in scholarly work by a student at an AGHE member institution who presents his or her work at the GSA Annual Meeting. If the quality of submissions meets the following guidelines, one award will be granted annually.

Eligibility

At the time of submissions, eligible students must be actively enrolled in a graduate program at an AGHE member institution. Students must first submit an abstract for presentation at the GSA Annual Meeting and be accepted for presentation.  

Criteria

1) Significance: Does this paper address an important problem? What is the potential effect of this paper on problems that drive this field?
         
2) Innovation: Does the paper employ novel concepts, approaches or methods? Is it original and innovative? Do findings or conclusions challenge existing paradigms or help develop new methodologies?
         
3) Approach: Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analyses adequately developed, well integrated, and appropriate to the purposes of the paper? Do the authors discuss the paper’s limitations?
         
4) Implications for gerontology and/or geriatrics education: Are the implications for education adequately articulated? Do the findings or conclusions have broad applicability?
         
5) Writing: Is the writing style concise? Are concepts, methods, and findings clearly explained? Does the submitted version of the manuscript suggest that the student carefully reviewed the manuscript (e.g., no grammatical, spelling, and typographical errors) and had feedback from others to improve the manuscript?

Selection

The review panel will include representatives from the Awards Committee and AGHE Student Representative, to serve as chair. Panel members will be expected to excuse themselves from the judging if they have a conflict of interest, and a replacement will be identified from the Awards Committee.

In addition to reading and evaluating each submission, panel members will be assigned paper(s) to critically review (depending on the number of finalists). For this review, the panel member will write a critique of the assigned manuscript that will be returned to the student. These reviews are intended to provide constructive comments to the authors in order to help them improve their papers, with the hope that they will revise and submit them for publication.

The chair shall tabulate the ratings and share the results with the panel, which review and select an award recipient.

Benefits

The awardee receives a personalized award certificate, a $250 cash award, and will be recognized at the AGHE Business Meeting at the GSA Annual Meeting.

Requirements

The student is responsible for submitting:

  1. An article submission-quality paper not to exceed 4000 words (not counting references and tables). Manuscripts must be double-spaced, employ 12-point font, and 1-inch margins. The review committee reserves the right to not consider a submission if it is determined that the author did not comply with the submission guidelines and criteria.
  2. A personal letter verifying that the work is his or her own.
  3. A letter from the student’s mentor or faculty advisor indicating that, at the time of abstract submission, the student was enrolled in a graduate program either part- or full-time, that the mentor endorses the submitted manuscript as one that merits consideration for such an award, and that the manuscript represents the student’s own work

Self Nomination Process

Submit using the online nominations portal.

Submission Period

July 1, 2019 to July 31, 2019.

Past Recipients

2018  Jill J. Naar | Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, "Exploring Intergenerational Educational Tourism Programs to Promote Age-Friendly Universities"
2017  Sara J. English | University of South Carolina,  "Increasing the Knowledge and Agency of Certified Nursing Assistants: A Response to Serious Mental Illness in Long Term Care"
2016  Reath Melendez | California State University, Long Beach, "Eldercare Responsibilities Among CSULB Faculty and Staff: A Needs Assessment"
2015-14 Not Awarded
2013  Kristen E. Porter | University of Massachusetts Boston, "Do LGBT Aging Trainings Effectual Positive Change in Mainstream Elder Service Providers?"
2012  Melinda S. Heinz | Iowa State University, "Teaching Sensitive Topics in Gerontology: Differences Between Online and Face-to-Face Courses"
2011  Not Awarded
2010  Deborah Gray | University of Massachusetts Boston, "Weight and Wealth: The Relationship Between Obesity and Net Worth for Pre-Retirement Aged Men and Women"
2009  Christina E. Miyawaki | University of California, Berkeley, "Preferences of Japanese American Baby Boomers about Senior Social Services and Senior Center Programs"
2008  Jessica E. Haxton | University of Denver, "Social Work Graduates: Transformative Field Experiences with Older Adults"

 


James McKenney Student Travel Award

James McKenney was a Mainer, born in Maine, resided there for most of his life and died in his home February 2015. With no formal advanced education, Jim was recognized for building the first super insulated home, a self-taught project in engineering. Jim highly valued education. When his friend, Marilyn R. Gugliucci, PhD, was serving as AGHE president 2008-2010, Jim established a planned giving gift for AGHE – 20% of his estate would be donated upon his death for advancing student education on aging.

Purpose of the Award

The James McKenney Student Travel Award provides travel funds for students to attend the AGHE programing at the GSA Annual Meeting. Approximately 10 students will be selected to receive travel funds each year.

Eligibility Criteria

Applicants must be a US or internationally matriculated student (undergraduate through post doctoral training) interested in gerontology/geriatrics – the field of aging (matriculation defined as being enrolled as of September for either a semester or the full academic year of the year of the Travel Award). AGHE membership status is not required although applications from students at AGHE member institutions are encouraged. If selected, an applicant must attend at least 2 days of the GSA Annual Meeting with mandatory attendance at the AGHE Business Meeting and ESPO Presidential Symposium. Attending mentoring sessions is encouraged. Award recipients will be recognized at the AGHE Business Meeting.

Selection

The AGHE Awards Committee will review nomiantions and select an awardee.

Benefits

An awardee receives funding which covers:

  1. One year of membership
  2. Pre-paid student registration for the Annual Meeting
  3. Pre-paid half day pre-conference workshop at the Annual Meeting
  4. Pre-paid ticket for the AGHE Business Meeting Breakfast
  5. $628 travel stipend paid after the Annual Meeting to offset travel, lodging, and/or meals expenses.

Requirements

The student is responsible for submitting:

1. Application Form

2. 250 word essay that addresses the question: “How will your participation in the GSA/AGHE Annual Meeting enhance your contribution to the field of aging?”

3. Curriculum Vitae or Resume

4. At the close of the GSA Annual Meeting, awardees will be required to complete a 50-100 word Post Annual Meeting Statement of Learning outlining what the most significant learning experience was from attending the Annual Meeting. This statement will be published in the AGHExchange newsletter.

Self Nomination Process

Submit using the online nominations portal.

Submission Period

July 1, 2019 to July 31, 2019.

















 

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